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Sending them to meet Mo, in person

Police have taken part in terror raids across western Sydney. Photo: NSW Police Media Unit

Police have taken part in terror raids across western Sydney. Photo: NSW Police Media Unit

 

Its sort of amazing just how nasty the latest plot to further the cause of Jihad in this country is, according to the news reports the plotters would have grapbbed a random person off the street and then brutally murdered them with a knife.

Police allege the 22-year-old, who was among 15 people arrested yesterday morning during the biggest anti-terrorism operation in Australia’s history, communicated with the Islamic State organisation while allegedly planning the attack.

TIMELINE: Terror hits home

Court documents allege Mr Azari had been preparing for the attack for several months, working closely with several other men including Mohammad Ali Baryalei, an Australian thought to be in Syria and working in a senior role with Islamic State.

Mr Azari “did between 8 May and 18 September 2014 conspire with Mohammad Baryalei and others to do acts in preparation for, or planning, a terrorist act (or acts)”, the documents allege. He could face a life sentence if convicted.

Police moved swiftly to arrest Mr Azari after intercepting a phone call two days earlier, Mr Allnutt told the court.

“There has been an immediate reaction to a clear and imperative danger,” he said.

The alleged attack “was clearly designed to shock the community as a whole with a plan to randomly select a person to rather gruesomely execute … I don’t think I’ve seen much worse”, Mr Allnutt told the court.

Mr Boland said the allegation was “based on one phone call”.

“As I understand it, there’s a very limited compass of information that federal police intend to put forward,” he said.

Bail was refused, and Mr Azari will return to court in November.

source

Even worse is the left’s favorite follower of Allah, Waleed Ali who seems to be suggesting that we should not even try to smash ISIL in Iraq because some new iteration of the Jihadi scourge will inevitably spring up in its place:

And it’s that thought that perhaps has the most to teach us in Australia. ISIL is not simply a group to be vanquished. It is not a fixed, finite, collection of people we can somehow control or eradicate. For us in Australia, it’s most dangerously a symbol: a brand a young man from Sydney can claim for himself; a flag in which he can wrap himself, and his proposed victim. For all its pretensions to statehood, the key thing is that it’s anything but. It exists in the mind as much as on land.

So it’s not the kind of thing we can simply destroy with military force. Modern terrorism doesn’t work that way. We keep killing “senior figures” in terrorist groups – indeed, it’s more than three years since we killed the most senior of them all – and nothing substantive changes. We tried to smash al-Qaeda. It fragmented, then morphed into a mass movement not truly under anyone’s direct control, with Osama bin Laden mostly a symbolic figurehead. Then it begat ISIL.

This yields a devilish problem: namely, that we are trying to confront a threat that exists nowhere in particular, and anywhere in theory. We can’t destroy that. Not in the short term and not with the kind of conventional force the state has at its disposal. What we can do is manage it. Arrest, prosecute, convict. The good news is, we’re good at that. The bad news is that this isn’t a cure. It’s the (certainly necessary) treatment of symptoms.

Ali is wrong about one thing and what he is wrong about is that there is a point to killing as many of the ISIL Jihadists as we can, simply put dead Jiahadists can’t commit any further atrocities, even if its only large numbers of the foot soldiers that we kill each one of them who is sent to their death is on less we have to worry about. The reports on twitter yesterday claimed 200 IS Jihadists were sent to Mohammad near Mosul yesterday, which is  a good start and I have no doubt taht more will join them over subsequent days and weeks. With a bit of luck those in control of the malignant IS  enterprise will likewise be sent to meet Mohammad, sooner rather than later. Ali is wrong on anther front too. His whole argument suggests that there is some way that ISIL et al can be dealt with on a political level. That is utter nonsense of course. We can no more reach a settlement with evangelical Islam than we could calm a rabid dog. There is only one way to deal with the brand of Islam that would enslave the world and that is to put down any who flock to its banners. With the sort of plotters arrested yesterday that means throwing them into the deepest darkest hole that our judiciary can find for them and keeping them there for as long as the law will allow. For their compatriots in Iraq and Syria it means bombing and strafing them until they don’t dare come out of their hidey holes.
Personally I don’t think that the campaign  in that part of the Levant will be as long as minions of the left like Waleed Ali imagine, simply put for  guerrilla war to be sustained you need the support of the indigenous population for the fighters cause and aims. In other words you need more than their acquiescence due to fear from your indigenous population. I very much doubt that ISIL is at all loved anywhere in Syria or Iraq so I don’t think that they are going to get as much support form the people as was the case during the post Saddam war in Iraq. Which means that as their fighters are wiped out there will joy form the locals rather than sorrow or anger. This joy could be the foundation upon which an enduring peace could be built if the Iraqi government can get its act together sadly I have my doubts that it can.
Cheers Comrades
Animated GIF knife

He who lives by the knife shall die by the hellfire missile

Who said we have nothing to worry about from the followers of Allah?

Police have taken part in terror raids across western Sydney. Photo: NSW Police Media Unit

Police have taken part in terror raids across western Sydney. Photo: NSW Police Media Unit

Police are carrying out terror raids across western Sydney.

NSW Police said the operation, which was still ongoing on Thursday morning, was the result of a counter-terrorism operation also involving the Australian Federal Police.

Officers have raided properties in Beecroft, Bellavista, Guildford, Merrylands, Northmead, Wentworthville, Marsfield, Westmead, Castle Hill, Revesby, Bass Hill and Regents Park.

Hundreds of police officers are believed to be involved in the operation.

A number of arrests have been made, but police would not specify how many.

It is understood that raids are also being carried out in Brisbane.

Further updates were expected later on Thursday morning.

Does this story give you reason to be at least suspicious of those who follow the teachings of Mohammad?
Sadly I think that it does because no matter how many times we tell our selves that those taking up the head chopping aspects of this faith are “a small minority” we still keep getting more and more examples that suggests the pernicious aspects of the ideology are more common and closer to the surface than apologists for Islam will admit. To be frank I think that as a society we have become increasingly more complacent about the potential for an atrocity here in our country since 9/11,the Bali bombings and London bombings. Our police and security services have just been far too effective in nipping nasty plots in the bud at an early stage for many of the public to accept the reality of the threat.  I want to suggest that everyone who thinks that we have nothing to worry about to do a little thought exercise next time they are in a crowded public space, you know in a commuter train or in the lobby of a cinema, just try to work out when you could flee to if that person with a back pack were to be carrying a bomb.
Have you had a few sobering thoughts?
I’m not saying that it is going to happen, heck I’m really hoping that it never happens in this country but such atrocities are all grown from the heart of Islam  and anyone who pretends otherwise is a fool. All that we can rely upon here, apart form the good efforts of our police force, is that the majority of Muslims in this country are in fact “bad” Muslims who like so many Christians are only nominal followers of their faith.  Frankly though I don’t want to rely on that for the safety of my fellow Australians.
Cheers  Comrades
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in a worst case scenario where would you flee to?

The real enemy within

Sadly too true Comrades

Muslim communities must face up to bad apples By Tanveer Ahmed

As a psychiatrist who visits jails, I see a lot of overlap between locals who are lured towards terror and many clients from Middle Eastern backgrounds I see in the legal ­system.

While the cries for calm and cohesion are laudable and the fears among the Muslim majority of being tarnished by a tiny minority appropriate, there remains a wholesale denial within sections of the Muslim community that the bad apples have any connection to the apple tree. Khaled Sharrouf was not an isolated individual, but a man with a family which was linked to a community.

There remains a marked difference in the way males are raised within some Lebanese groups which predisposes them to greater acts of anti-social behaviour. It is a fairly specific segment of the Lebanese community and a result of the migration of poorer farmers and lower-class Lebanese Muslims after the civil war in 1975. Their numbers and concentration are greatest in southwestern Sydney.

There is a rampant anti-social character to some youths from this segment which stems in part from unsuccessful child rearing. The horrific moves towards terror acts can be seen as an ideological extension of a propensity towards bad behaviour, combined with an unshakable victim mentality.

There are clear trends in the ­clients I see from Arab groups in jails. They come from large families. The fathers were often absent while they worked unskilled jobs trying to provide. The mothers lacked the extended family support they may have had in their ancestral lands. Parenting focused on the daughters, for in the world the mothers knew girls needed more discipline and attention for opportunity and marriage to beckon. The men were placed on a pedestal with few behavioural limits. The relatively absent fathers, who might have disciplined the sons, compounded the problems.

I see further key psychological differences among these groups, particularly the Lebanese or the children of refugees from Iraqi or Afghan backgrounds. They are likely to see anger in different ways to Westerners or migrants from more educated ethnic groups. While expressions of anger and threats are a quick way to lose face in polite Western society, it is more acceptable within Arab groups. At its worst, calm, measured responses to conflict may be seen as weak.

This is outlined by Danish psychologist Nicolai Sennell’s groundbreaking work visiting Muslim criminals in jail, where he makes reference to the Arab notion of “holy anger”, which is completely foreign to English.

Another key difference is the psychological idea of “locus of control”. This refers to whether we believe our lives are driven primarily by internal or external factors.

Western thinking teaches that we have some control of our destinies. In its most optimistic forms, it is the basis for the self-help industry. Applying these kinds of ideas to my Muslim patients, particularly first-generation or less educated migrants, is extremely difficult. There is simply no such concept in Arab cultures.

What Arab cultures have are strict external rules, traditions and laws for human behaviour. They have a God that decides their life’s course. “Inshallah” follows every statement about future plans: if God wills it to occur. They have powerful Muslim clerics who set directions for their community every Friday. These clerics dictate political views, child-rearing behaviour and whether to integrate into Western societies.

In societies shaped under Islamic influences there is little emphasis on guilt and a greater likelihood to demand that society adapt to one’s own wishes.

Muslim youths have unique difficulties in coming to terms with their identity, especially when they have conflicting value systems at home compared with school or work. This can produce greater deviance, a point better measured in Britain where South Asian youth suffer from mental illness at three times the rate of the general population.

But there are Muslim youths from many different countries living in Sydney. Other Arab Australians from Egypt, Jordan or Iran do not have the same problems. If you meet them, they will be quick to point out that their community’s migration was from a more skilled base. They had smaller families, focused on their children’s education and integrated more easily.

There is no doubt Muslim communities throughout the Western world have been under the pump since the age of terror unleashed itself this century. But for all the ­interfaith work, awareness building and cries for tolerance, there continues to be a significant tendency to externalise all blame.

Reproduced here under the terms if its creative commons license originally published here

Mike Carlton’s Career suicide bombing via twitter

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You  just  got to love crap like this:

In a letter to the Fairfax chief executive, Greg Hywood, and editor-in-chief, Darren Goodsir, the Australian National Imams Council, Islamic Council of New South Wales and Muslim Legal Network New South Wales, among others, said they would boycott the Sydney Morning Herald unless the outspoken columnist was reinstated.

Carlton quit the Herald on Wednesday after being told he would be suspended for the language he used when replying to readers who objected to an article he wrote discussing the conflict in Gaza. The editor-in-chief of the SMH and Sun-Herald, Darren Goodsir, said Carlton had used “inappropriate and offensive language” – not in the column, but in his responses to readers.

In Saturday’s Sydney Morning Herald, Carlton’s column was replaced by one by author and columnist John Birmingham.

The letter to Fairfax said the Muslim groups would consider notifying community organisations and spokespersons to cease cooperating with Fairfax journalists for media interviews.

“As representatives of the Muslim community we have always regarded Fairfax to be one the more balanced media organisations in the country and where possible we have co-operated with your journalists on countless stories,” it said.

“But with the resignation of Mr Carlton from your publications we have now lost one of the very few voices advocating for the Palestinian cause in the country.”

A media campaign targeting Fairfax advertisers was also being considered, the groups said.

Source

Lets face it Mike Carlton has always been a rather nasty piece of work in the boorish leftard mould and it was his boorishness that has cause Fairfax to give him the opportunity to resign. He forgot the most important thing in public life which is no matter how nasty your interlocutors may be one has to maintain a certain level of decorum and you certainly don’t publicly abuse them on twitter or any other forum.

As for the threat to boycott Fairfax from the   “the Australian National Imams Council, Islamic Council of New South Wales and Muslim Legal Network New South Wales, et al” I can’t help thinking that the only significant thing about these groups is their overly grandiose titles and inflated notions of their own self importance. Honestly who could possibly care if they won’t talk to Fairfax?  I ‘m sure that the Fairfax editors are laughing into their Lattes this morning at such an impotent attempt at blackmail.

As for Carlton anyone want to give me odds that he will soon be embraced by that leader in apologia for Islam, The Guardian, sooner rather than later? After all it is where all of the otherwise washed up hard left Journos all seem to end up.

Cheers Comrades

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Ebola and what it may do to humanity on this planet

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Click for source

If there is any disease that strikes terror into anyone’s hearts it should be Ebola if you have just come back form the Link I posted I have no doubt that you will have experienced that shiver down your spine of REAL terror. Sadly I think that we are witnessing the African pandemic that I have been expecting for a very long time. You see I don’t think that this outbreak will be contained and that the current death toll is going to become exponentially  worse in a very short time frame Frankly all it will take is one international traveler to contract the disease and this could have global consequences.

I hope my dark prediction is wrong Comrades but I see no reason that it should be, its already getting past current attempts to contain it and I’m also sure that among all of the hand wringing, the sackcloth and ashes from the “compassionate Green left” there will also be more than a few devotees of Gaia who are going to see this as the will of the goddess.  And maybe there is more than a  seed of truth to the nation that disease and pandemics are the way that balance is restored when a species begins to reach the limits of its ecosystem to sustain it.  After all humanity messed with all of the other checks and balances on our numbers globally with our vaccines and disease prevention programs  we have made possible the global population boom in the last couple of centuries. Sadly try as we might modern technological society has not been able to make the idea of restraining fecundity popular in the over crowded third world the same way that it has become the norm in the first world. Its obvious to me the “refugee” crisis that the planet faces is also an artifact of the same rubric. Well if things go the way that I am imagining then much of that impetus to move into the first world may be hugely diminished. Simply put empty countries will not provide the same incentive to emigrate.

For the duration of an active pandemic may well provide the understandable  urge to flee but the need for disease containment and quarantine will constrain people movement and after up to 90% mortality every able body will be needed to rebuild viable societies competitive pressures will be for all intents and purposes be gone and healthy citizens will be at a premium in all of the countries where life is now so cheap that snuffing them out means nothing.  If we need to look for historical precedents the effects of the bubonic plague in Europe gives us some idea of what we can expect. Whole cities essentially emptied of their people, the dead lest unburied, houses and farms abandoned and left to decay.

As both an Island and a first world nation Australia is well placed to weather this coming storm we can quarantine ourselves against the ingress of the pandemic in a way that others won’t be able to do. The global politics of this will not be at all pretty but I suspect that it will prove one thing and it is this. “Climate change*” just won’t matter because a world with substantially fewer people on it is going to have substantially lower emissions of CO2 and that is the salvation the Profits of the faith say we need…

Tin foil hat time:

Maybe the Ebola outbreak has been engineered by “Deep Green” activists to “save” the planet… Would they really do it?  I would hope not but you just never know when it comes to those who are driven by a mad ideology

No Cheers on this one Comrades

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 *assuming that the Profits of the Green religion are right which is a big ask

“It’s about time the exit death industry was investigated” By Paul Russell

Find below an interesting essay By Paul Russell that I reproduce under its Creative Commons license from Online Opinion. I think that Paul makes a quite persuasive argument that Dr Nitschke goes too far in trying to make suicide seem more rational than it often is one thing we can be sure of and taht is its not as sweet as its presented in Soylent Green

Cheers Comrades

charlton-heston-soylent-green

Bouquets to Jeff Kennett and the Beyond Blue organisation for their clear and appropriate condemnation of the actions, or rather inactions, of Dr Philip Nitschke in relation to the suicide death of a Perth man in the story that ran on the ABC’s 7:30 report a little over a week ago.

According to the media reports and to Dr Nitschke’s twitter feed, he is basing his defence, in part at least, on his claim that there is such a thing as rational suicide.

The idea that suicide can be somehow a rational choice is not new. In fact, an organisation exists in the UK called the ‘Society for Rational Old Age Suicide’ and there has been one study that I am aware of that canvasses the issue.

Dr Nitschke has consistently maintained that every adult should have access to the means to their own end. The faux lower limit, in light of this, seems more about trying to soften the public perception of this macabre death industry than it does about any corporate sense of public duty.

When we think of suicide we commonly understand that people who contemplate ending their lives will be viewing their problems through a very dark lens that does not, at that time, offer them any hope or possibility that what troubles them could be dealt with in a less dramatic fashion.

But there is always hope; there is always some other solution. Time, good counselling, talking to family and friends, taking exercise and a good night’s rest can all help us see past those solitary, dark moments. We can all help.

Some years ago now, my work with homeless and at risk youth gave me a very clear window into this issue. That’s why I’m so grateful for the work of Beyond Blue and other suicide prevention organisations. Suicidal people can often appear to be quite rational; their plan and their reasoning behind it, quite compelling. Were we to have accepted the assertion that any of these people should simply be left unchallenged and unsupported because they could put up a calm and cogent argument for their actions we would have been abandoning them in their time of deepest need. The intuitive assessment that suicide should be shunned and is never the only option is natural, normal and something hardwired into humanity. Thank goodness!

And while the argument about whether or not someone can be genuinely rational is, intuitively false – an oxymoron as one commentator put it – it is largely academic and should not be brought to bear upon suicide prevention nor our natural responses to those in need. The message would be a dangerous one and bears within it the distinct possibility of an implied endorsement of some suicides.

Think about it. At the end of this article and of every story on this subject we’ve grown to expect that responsible media will always carry a closing line saying something like: “If this article troubles you, phone…….. for confidential help.” If Dr Nitschke’s argument holds true, would public policy then demand that we add something like: “Unless you consider yourself rational; in which case contact Exit on….”? Yes, I know an example in extremis but I think it makes the point.

That the public commentary has focussed on the WA man is understandable in as much as he had direct contact with Dr Nitschke. But the ABC’s story also told of the suicide death of a 25 year old Victorian man who used the services of Exit to purchase information and thereby, a prohibited substance to end his own life. Nitschke’s defence here that the man lied about his age on a tick box on an Exit website is as ludicrous as is Exit’s self-imposed supposed lower age limit of 50 years for such services.

It is this supposed right-to-die that is the false over-arching philosophy by which the death of a young person can be somehow ‘rationalised’ by Nitschke and Exit. In 2010, in response to a Victorian Institute of Forensic Medicine Report showing that two thirds of deaths in the preceding decade using the Exit drug-of-choice, Nembutal, were for people under the age of 50 with nearly one-third being younger than 40 and six being in their 20s, Nitschke said: ”There will be some casualties … but this has to be balanced with the growing pool of older people who feel immense wellbeing from having access to this information.” Tell that to the families of the two men featured in the 7:30 Report! Suicide prevention should never accept the notion of acceptable casualties!

And herein lies a bigger question which suicide prevention organisations and the Australian public generally need to come to terms with: How is it that we have somehow grown to accept that it’s okay for older people to seek to end their lives; that there’s somehow a distinction to be made about access to suicide methods and suicide ideation, generally, based upon age?

This notion that somehow ‘older people…feel immense wellbeing’ from having the means to kill themselves is very odd indeed. Certainly, studies on people who have accessed suicide methods in Oregon under their legalised suicide system do point to this as an outcome for some. But if we apply the same general thinking towards people who are suicidal as described earlier (and I argue that we should), we should be thinking clearly about the reality that there is always another way past presenting difficulties and dilemmas – even if these problems ultimately include advancing age or a difficult prognosis.

We should be preventing suicide by treating every suicidal person with equal respect and act the same in every case. If not, then aren’t we at risk of failing people in the same way as Nitschke’s cry for the recognition of rational suicide would?
It’s about time this macabre and clandestine industry was subject to public scrutiny.

Cry Context and the ability to read

Cheers Comrades

NoSharia-NoJihad

 

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