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A broadband Ford in every household

Those who complain about the Coalition’s “lack of policy” should be very pleased by their announcement of their broadband policy which was both well detailed  well explained. As I have been saying for ages the average person does not need a Rolls-Royce and that is precisely the what that the presentation here is arguing.

Apart from one obnoxious journalist with a clear agenda  the announcement was very well received

Cheers Comrades

 Jack Russell terrier Tex playing with a Droolia Julia doll, which is available from an Adelaide pet store. Picture: NAOMI JELLICOE Source: adelaidenow

Jack Russell terrier Tex playing with a Droolia Julia doll, which is available from an Adelaide pet store. Picture: NAOMI JELLICOE Source: adelaidenow

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50 Comments

  1. deknarf says:

    Iain! You really can’t be serious on this one! It’s a lemon, is being called ‘Fraudband’, some 75%+ of those canvassed prefer Labors NBN, those who know technically think its a joke, and Turnbull is now being referred to as ‘Fraudbull’!
    I for one don’t want a Ford, especially if its the very first one ever built by Henry!! I’m on ADSL copper now and it’s an expensive sloth!

  2. Ray Dixon says:

    It’s laughable, Iain. Abbott has just kicked a massive own-goal. Unbelievably stupid.

  3. Iain Hall says:

    Ray and Deknarf did either of you actually watch the whole presentation that I posted here?
    Because It does not sound like it to me.

  4. Ray Dixon says:

    You don’t have to watch the entire (and embarrassing) 42 minutes of the presentation to know it’s a lemon, Iain. Gee … didn’t Malcolm look embarrassed too? He looked like he didn’t want to be there.

  5. Iain Hall says:


    A shorter version of the announcement so you can get the gist.

  6. Ray Dixon says:

    I got “the gist”, Iain. Everyone has – the coaltion is (a) admitting a fibre-based NBN is the way to go and (b) is prepared to waste $30 billion not giving us one.

  7. Richard Ryan says:

    Australia’s Iron Lady? Tony Abbott.

  8. Ray Dixon says:

    I’m surprised (and relieved) that Iain hasn’t put up a eulogy on her yet, Richard. Hopefully he won’t.

  9. Iain Hall says:

    Ray and Richard
    I have at best ambivalent feelings about Thatcher I very much respect the way that she did not hesitate to retake the Falklands but I an less enthusiastic about many of her English social changes. For instance I thought that breaking the strangle hold of the militant unions was a good thing but the selling off of public housing was far less beneficial, but then I have never been a big fan of the “privatise everything brigade” especially when it comes to things like electricity and other utilities.

  10. Ray Dixon says:

    Phew …. we missed a bullet on that one, Iain. Or maybe you did? On the same subject, I see one of your punk rock heroes Johnny Rotten managed to disgrace himself on The Project last night. He makes Thatcher look good.

  11. Iain Hall says:

    Yes I happened to see him on the project and got the distinct feeling he was taking the piss

  12. GD says:

    I enjoyed the repartee between tax-payer funded leftie Jon Faine and self made millionaire Malcolm Turnbull on ABC radio yesterday morning.

    JON FAINE INTERVIEW WITH MALCOLM TURNBULL
    ABC 774 MELBOURNE
    WEDNESDAY 10 APRIL 2013

    [excerpt]

    JON FAINE:

    Yesterday at Rupert Murdoch’s new trophy headquarters, Tony Abbott and Malcolm Turnbull announced NBN-lite. It’s been dismissed in the papers this morning by many columnists across the board as being a lemon, a dog or a policy failure. There’s also been announcements this week on industrial relations and the automotive industry. Malcolm Turnbull, Shadow Communications Minister joins us from Sydney. Good morning, Mr Turnbull.

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Good morning, Jon. Hey, look, your introduction there is outrageously biased and inaccurate. I mean, let me just run through the people that have welcomed and praised the approach we’re taking….

    JON FAINE:

    Independent people, Mr Turnbull, or people who are part of your support team?

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Why don’t you just listen to me and just don’t interrupt me and I’ll actually give you the answer. Graham Lynch, the founder of CommsDay and the leading technology and telecom journalist in the country. Bill Morrow, the Chief Executive of Vodafone. Ian Martin, the leading telecoms analyst in the stockbroking world. Tony Brown, one of the leading telecoms experts working for Informer. Kevin Morgan, leading…

    JON FAINE:

    I’m sure there’s a cheer squad, Mr Turnbull, but the overall consensus of the independent commentators is that this is a policy opportunity missed.

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Who? Who are they? Name them. Come on. Name them, Jon.

    JON FAINE:

    Well, the newspaper columnists all the way across the board.

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    No. Name them, name them, Jon. Name them.

    JON FAINE:

    Laura Tingle…

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Oh, Laura Tingle! She’s a telecoms expert, is she?

    JON FAINE:

    No, she’s a policy analyst and a political commentator…

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Oh, Jon.

    JON FAINE:

    …and on and on across the board. I’ve read all the papers this morning, as have you.

    MALCOLM TURNBULL:

    Jon, you and I have had a lot of interviews and I’ve great respect for you, but that was a shockingly unbalanced and biased introduction.

    ——————/

    After that great introduction full of rhetoric and bullsh*t, all pathetic tax-payer funded leftie Jon Faine could come up with was, wait for it, ‘Laura Tingle’. So much for ‘it’s been dismissed in the papers this morning by many columnists across the board as being a lemon, a dog or a policy failure.’

    Why are we paying these leftards to embrace their inner child in the comfort of the tax-payer funded ABC, while the rest of the country works for a living?

  13. Iain Hall says:

    The beauty of Malcolm Turnbull’s solution is that it pushes fibre out closer to the customer, within hundreds of metres in some cases, helping delivering higher speeds but at a much lower labour and cost requirement because it uses the existing copper in the street.

    Circumstances have changed since April 2009 when Senator Conroy made the then technically-correct decision to go with fibre-to-the-home (FTTH) as the only realistic way to get super-fast broadband speeds greater than 25Mbps and approaching the 50/100Mbps mark. He also announced the policy in the midst of a global financial crisis where mass unemployment seemed a likely possibility, and thus a nation-building project such as the NBN would have easy access to human resources. Of course, the GFC didn’t affect Australia that much and labour shortages, especially in the skilled fibre splicing area, are more the contemporary reality, adding to cost and deployment pressures for the NBN.

    Meanwhile, many other GFC-afflicted nations simply made the judgement that they couldn’t afford expensive FTTH networks on a scale such as Australia’s. Affordability has always been an earmark of the internet revolution. The first steps, from dial-up to DSL, had per-user costs that could be measured in the low hundreds of dollars. By contrast, the next step, to full fibre to the premise, costs a couple of thousands dollars at least, and based on existing NBN deployments, closer to $4000 in Australian conditions. Many countries simply cannot contemplate this sharp rise in incremental cost.

    As a result, technology companies worked on ways to develop faster speeds over existing infrastructure. So HFC networks, originally designed for one-way TV distribution, can now support gigabit speeds at the node. Mobile networks, originally designed for voice calls and limited text messaging, will soon support similar speeds at the base station. And new vectoring technologies, which eliminate noise on the copper network, dramatically increase the speeds of DSL from the current 25Mbps theoretical limit to above 50 and up to 100Mbps. All these technologies can be deployed over legacy networks for fractions of the cost of a new FTTH network. And one shouldn’t assume they have reached a technological dead-end: further improvements are on the horizon.

    The current NBN plan, ironically, tacitly acknowledges these developments by using cutting-edge wireless and satellite tech, albeit only in the bush, something which will be retained under the Coalition. But the cost savings of the Coalition plan – which they estimate at a minimum of $15 billion – come from acknowledging that a one-size fits all FTTH solution for urban and regional centres is too big an incremental cost leap when existing platforms can be upgraded to get higher speeds far more cheaply.

    It’s worth acknowledging that the latest Coalition plan is more similar than different to the Labor NBN, something Malcolm Turnbull’s detractors should give him credit for. It retains the “Telstra structural separation” and “universal service” aspects, seen as key to promoting better competition in the retail market and equity goals for the bush.

    Six years ago, the Coalition was promising no more than a scrappy bush wireless network using a now dying technology called WiMAX and an unfunded upgrade of the urban copper network. Three years later, in the 2010 election, it had upped the stakes to $6 billion for essentially the same 2007 outcome. Now it is promising $29 billion for a national network using a combination of upgrades to legacy networks and new turnkey FTTH connections to the most economic 22% of customer base, essentially new housing, locations of high demand such as schools and hospitals and areas where an upgrade of the copper network would be economically senseless.

    For mine, this is probably a little more expensive than the end-off payoff would allow but it is still considerably less expensive than the Labor NBN plan which would lead to Australia having the most expensive cost base for fixed telecommunications in the world. Add to the fact that Senator Conroy has set spectrum reserve prices at world highs and Australia has the prospect of facing the highest cost base for both fixed and mobile telecommunications in the world – not something I am sure is a great legacy to leave future generations.

    There may be plenty to quibble about with Mr Turnbull’s fine print but this is assuaged by the reality that he has committed to submit his policy to no less than three separate reviews post-election: into the NBN’s strategic options, an audit of its finances and costs and an overall cost-benefit analysis. Presumably this allows Turnbull to change his policy when and where the facts informing it change. This is in stark contrast to an existing NBN policy which was effectively set in stone in April 2009 by diktat with virtually no open, informed or transparent consideration of the alternatives or the “counter-factuals” as economists might put it.

    Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/it-pro/government-it/why-the-coalitions-nbn-plan-makes-sense-20130410-2hkx2.html#ixzz2Q5H7TSHL

  14. Craigy says:

    So Tony Abbott has been rolled by Turnbull and is again looking like a goose.

    As we all remember, he told Turnbull to demolish the NBN, said that the money should be spent on transport infrastructure, called the NBN a white elephant and said we don’t need it, now he seems to have had a change of heart.

    So is Tony just the dipshi*t, poll driven, opportunist that he is accused of being….dam right he is…..And you can’t believe a word he says…clearly.

    http://delimiter.com.au/2012/07/06/australia-doesnt-need-the-nbn-says-abbott/

  15. Iain Hall says:

    I naturally don’t see it that way at all Craigy, Its very much a case of the Coalition having to do their best to both deliver the broadband that is needed and to try to make something viable from the dogs breakfast that has been created by Labor. As I have repeatedly argued for the sort of solution that is now being mooted by Turnbull here I feel vindicated.

  16. Craigy says:

    Like I said, Abbott has been rolled by Turnbull. No leadership at all, he is a goose. Thanks for confirming that.

  17. Iain Hall says:

    Only a Greens voter like you would think like that Craigy 😉

  18. Craigy says:

    No, it’s your view expressed above…..

    “the sort of solution that is now being mooted by Turnbull”

    Tony wanted him to demolish the NBN……$6 billion was all Tony said they would spend, he’s either been rolled or he’s telling pork pies…..

  19. Craigy says:

    If we are to go by the standards that LNP supporters demand of the ALP then Tony is clearly not in control of his own party, they are out of control and Turnbull is a thorn in Abbott’s side. Abbott shows poor leadership. It is clear that he has no conviction or original ideas and would therefore make a very poor leader of this fine country.

  20. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy You can do better than that sort of nonsense straight out of the Gillard play book, now tell me honestly will the speeds mooted in the announcement be adequate for most people or not?

    If not then why not?

  21. GD says:

    Craigy said:

    As we all remember, he told Turnbull to demolish the NBN, said that the money should be spent on transport infrastructure, called the NBN a white elephant and said we don’t need it, now he seems to have had a change of heart.

    Yes, we all remember that Craigy, but try and keep up. If you had read Iain’s quoted article you would understand why.

    The original cost of the network was $37 billion, over a period of ten years. The projected cost is now $90 billion, with completion dates somewhere in the never never. Rather than scrap the entire project perhaps it now makes sense to save some of the furniture. Unlike Labor and the Greens, the Libs actually take into consideration the effect of financial decisions on future generations. Borrowing more from China to build an uncosted ‘back of a coaster’ NBN is not their idea of good policy.

    As Iain said:

    Its very much a case of the Coalition having to do their best to both deliver the broadband that is needed and to try to make something viable from the dogs breakfast that has been created by Labor.

    Back to the article:

    Mr Turnbull has committed to submit his policy to no less than three separate reviews post-election: into the NBN’s strategic options, an audit of its finances and costs and an overall cost-benefit analysis. This allows Turnbull to change his policy when and where the facts informing it change. This is in stark contrast to an existing NBN policy which was effectively set in stone in April 2009 by diktat with virtually no open, informed or transparent consideration of the alternatives or the “counter-factuals” as economists might put it.

    Clearly, Abbott and Turnbull are considering what is in the best pragmatic interests of the country. Given that Labor has wracked up a debt of $270 billion, surely it makes sense to build an NBN that is affordable rather than borrowing more from China to finance a ‘pie in the sky’, ‘back of a coaster’ scheme that is already years behind schedule and billions over budget.

  22. GD says:

    So Tony Abbott has been rolled by Turnbull and is again looking like a goose

    I think you’re channelling my ditty about Labor, Craigy. It’s not Tony who’s looking like a goose, it’s Swan.

    the deficit is on the loose
    Swan is looking like a goose

    I’m glad you’re paying attention.

  23. Craigy says:

    Iain, no the speeds will not be enough….The slower speeds will mean it won’t promote the economic activity that a full NBN will….

    The new full NBN will open up opportunities for new business and allow us to keep up with the rest of the developed world….Turnbull’s idea will just hold us back….

    Where I work, they are already developing new technologies that will use the full bandwidth to the home.

    What you, GD and the LNP boosters don’t get, or refuse to see, is that allowing business’s that can afford to connect to the faster FTTH is one thing, but if the service they provide needs their customers to have a fibre connection, then they won’t make many sales under the Turnbull plan.

    GD, can you tell me what it is going to cost to upgrade the Turnbull NBN when it becomes too slow in about 10 years time?…….Can you also tell me how much the lost business will cost us because it is too slow for the next generation of on-line commerce?…..

    Copper to the home, in 2020, you’ve got to be kidding me……Have you read anything about 4k and 8k television?

  24. Craigy says:

    Anyway, the real issue here is how Turnbull rolled Abbott and Abbott is now pretending he supports the NBN, all be it a slow one….

    It comes down to trust, as you have pointed out with Gillard, we clearly can’t trust Abbott or anything that comes out his mouth…

    Will he really wind back the NBN, the mining super profits tax and the carbon price scheme? Who knows, he can’t be trusted based on the lies he has already told. You will be back pedaling at a million miles an hour once he is in power and starts breaking all his promises, he has started already.

    As for the money well spent by the current Government, well, we have the strongest economy in the developed world, kind of speaks for itself don’t you think GD?

  25. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy
    I really don’t see the point of ultra high definition television and nor do I suspect will most of the public we run into the simple fact that human vision will not be able to tell the difference. In any event the technology won’t improve the actual product, frankly teh though of seeing shows like the biggest loser in super HD is rather horrifying.

    That said what precisely do the technologies that you are developing propose to do?
    Because just something that can be done does not of necessity have to be done if it has no social value.

  26. Ray Dixon says:

    The real problem with fibre to the node is the copper wire extensions into the household won’t be able to handle the ever-increasing load of information that will come via the fibre optic cable, meaning eventually it will HAVE to be fibre to the home. All the coalition is proposing is to delay the full implementation … and by so doing it will end up costing more than Labor’s plan. It’s as simple as that – the coalition’s so-called savings are bullshit. The real cost is hidden. They are trying to pull a stunt here and it will backfire.

    Now, I’m off somewhere in my up-to-the-minute car. Thank Christ it’s not a Ford.

  27. Craigy says:

    Ray is spot on, except for the crack at Ford……

    Iain, do you still have a CRT TV set or a nice HD flat screen?

    Your point about human vision not telling the diff is not correct, have you ever seen a 4k picture?

    Still, you are on the right tram to support your opinion makers at the Murdoch press, as Murdoch is right behind the Turnbull plan. This is because FTTH will destroy the business model for pay TV. Anyone with content can set up a Foxtel, with higher quality than cable can deliver. Murdoch isn’t interested in the NBN as it will give us all much more choice in who we buy our media from.

    In the US, many new companies are already setting up to deliver entertainment services via high speed broadband and 4k is part of that mix.

    The kinds of projects/research being undertaken at Universities around Australia, to make use of the NBN, include entertainment/media, medical, retail, communications and lots of different science related ideas.

    See the problem is that many of the kinds of things possible on the NBN are yet to be available, so there is no way you or the NLP supporters can say we don’t need it. Based on what we can do on the internet today, we don’t need a fast NBN, but in less than 10 years we will.

    As an example take games. Gaming is a huge industry worth billions worldwide. If I had said to you a few years back that cable internet will be too slow for multiplayer games in less than 10 years you would have laughed at me. But the games under development now are designed for 50-100mbps broadband and these will be rolled out when the technology catches-up. The investment is already being made and if it can’t be sold in Australia because we have a slow NBN then they will only be available in the US, Europe or Asia. Our retailers will miss out.

    I heard a retailer on talkback yesterday. He has developed a virtual shop using 3D virtual reality software that allows you to enter his ‘shop’ and pick up and examine in great detail the products on his ‘shelves’. He can afford to pay the premium that Turnbull expects business to pay to connect to a fibre tail. The only problem is, if his customers don’t have a full fibre connection, they won’t be able to visit his shop and get the full features of his site.

    You may have noticed that even programs are now being made available from the cloud. This means that you don’t load them on your computer you run them remotely from a server. Programs and data sizes keep growing and that won’t slow down any time soon, as programmers are writing for high speed broadband NOW.

    With an aging population, a huge amount of research money is going into on-line medicine. The faster the speeds into people’s homes the more efficiently we can get from this. Slow broadband will not help reduce this huge cost into the future.

    Education is also moving on-line. We are currently producing lectures and other teaching tools that will make higher learning accessible to people at a much lower cost. This has been going on for some time but has recently accelerated with the NBN roll out.

    You see we are not just talking about future costs and investment we are talking about what is actually already in development and all of it requires the fastest possible NBN. If it isn’t needed now, by the time Turnbull rolls out his system it will be time to upgrade it.

    The NLP proposal for the NBN will hold back Australia in so many ways….I could go on and on…..The sad thing is that Tunbull and Abbott have shown that that are willing to sacrifice Australia’s future prosperity and give us aging baby boomers expensive medical and the young ones more expensive education, just to win the election. It’s irresponsible and shows they are not fit to lead.

  28. Richard Ryan says:

    Eulogy:
    The Iron Lady is gone to the great big scrap metal yard in the sky, alongside the Argentinian warship General Belgrano. I shed no tears for the Iron Lady, who put many of the working class on the scrap heap, who survived an IRA attack, but death got her in the end. The good news, the song, The Witch Is Dead is creeping up the British charts. Shalom.

  29. Richard Ryan says:

    Howard who plunged Australia into the Iraqi war, based on Bush’s judgement will attend the funreal of the Iron Lady—-see dark clouds here?

  30. Iain Hall says:

    Ray
    the problem with the Labor scheme is not a technical one but the cost and the proposed time-frame, with the former Labor are spending so much money that the chances of the NBN ever repaying the investment are so slim as to be non-existent, especially as their projected revenue is real pie in the sky stuff and never likely to be met.

    Craigy

    Your point about human vision not telling the diff is not correct, have you ever seen a 4k picture?

    No and I doubt that most people have either.

    Still, you are on the right tram to support your opinion makers at the Murdoch press, as Murdoch is right behind the Turnbull plan. This is because FTTH will destroy the business model for pay TV. Anyone with content can set up a Foxtel, with higher quality than cable can deliver. Murdoch isn’t interested in the NBN as it will give us all much more choice in who we buy our media from.

    I have never had subscription TV and I never will and really I don’t care about it either. that said what the opposition propose is claimed to be capable of simultaneously downloading four HD video streams at the same time why would any household need more than that?

    In the US, many new companies are already setting up to deliver entertainment services via high speed broadband and 4k is part of that mix.

    Maybe but its only ever going to be viable if you have a large audience in a small area, the exact opposite of our situation in Australia.

    The kinds of projects/research being undertaken at Universities around Australia, to make use of the NBN, include entertainment/media, medical, retail, communications and lots of different science related ideas.

    And what sort of band width do any of those things individually need? Keep in mind that you are unlikely to need to use more than one or two of those things at the same time in the average home.

    See the problem is that many of the kinds of things possible on the NBN are yet to be available, so there is no way you or the NLP supporters can say we don’t need it. Based on what we can do on the internet today, we don’t need a fast NBN, but in less than 10 years we will.

    Just because something is possible does not mean that its necessary or that its loss will be seriously missed.

    As an example take games. Gaming is a huge industry worth billions worldwide. If I had said to you a few years back that cable internet will be too slow for multiplayer games in less than 10 years you would have laughed at me. But the games under development now are designed for 50-100mbps broadband and these will be rolled out when the technology catches-up. The investment is already being made and if it can’t be sold in Australia because we have a slow NBN then they will only be available in the US, Europe or Asia. Our retailers will miss out.

    Well I am actually a gamer Craigy so I have some idea of what is involved I have played a lot of different games including games that have a big on-line multi player component. Most work(as far as I can tell) by each console having an iteration of the environment existing on the players machine and the servers align the actions of each player’s avatar with those of the others playing on any individual server.The issue with gaming is not the fancy graphics (which are nice) but the writing and the sort of scenarios that are foundational to the game-play that need to improve far more than the graphics.

    I heard a retailer on talkback yesterday. He has developed a virtual shop using 3D virtual reality software that allows you to enter his ‘shop’ and pick up and examine in great detail the products on his ‘shelves’. He can afford to pay the premium that Turnbull expects business to pay to connect to a fibre tail. The only problem is, if his customers don’t have a full fibre connection, they won’t be able to visit his shop and get the full features of his site.

    On line shopping is something we do here at Chez Hall and frankly I don’t think that such simulations add that much to the the shopping experience all a buyer needs is good clear images of the product and a timely response to any queries. The sticking point with Online shopping will always be the lag between purchase and delivery and no amount of fancy simulation will solve that problem.

    You may have noticed that even programs are now being made available from the cloud. This means that you don’t load them on your computer you run them remotely from a server. Programs and data sizes keep growing and that won’t slow down any time soon, as programmers are writing for high speed broadband NOW.

    I have may doubts about the efficacy of “cloud storage of data especially in terms of its security.

    With an aging population, a huge amount of research money is going into on-line medicine. The faster the speeds into people’s homes the more efficiently we can get from this. Slow broadband will not help reduce this huge cost into the future.

    What more that a HD vidio signal do you think is necessary? because unless everyone has their own Cat scanner(or other fancy diagnostic devices) in the home I can’t see the need for more than bandwidth proposed.

    Education is also moving on-line. We are currently producing lectures and other teaching tools that will make higher learning accessible to people at a much lower cost. This has been going on for some time but has recently accelerated with the NBN roll out.

    As with Medicine how much more that a HD video signal would a householder need for lectures and education?

    You see we are not just talking about future costs and investment we are talking about what is actually already in development and all of it requires the fastest possible NBN. If it isn’t needed now, by the time Turnbull rolls out his system it will be time to upgrade it.

    Any network is always going to be a work in progress and there has to be a sound business case for the sort of investment that is involved and it makes far more sense to get a serviceable system up and running sooner and incrementally improving the network over time.

    The NLP proposal for the NBN will hold back Australia in so many ways….I could go on and on…..The sad thing is that Tunbull and Abbott have shown that that are willing to sacrifice Australia’s future prosperity and give us aging baby boomers expensive medical and the young ones more expensive education, just to win the election. It’s irresponsible and shows they are not fit to lead.

    The future prosperity of the media and gaming industries may well benefit from Labor’s vision being fully realised however the rest of the nature will have improved prosperity by not having the sort of debt that the Labor NBN is piling up without any restraint every day that Gillard in in the lodge.

  31. Craigy says:

    Your clearly very ignorant on this issue Iain, I don’t intend to go through all your points as everyone of them is basically wrong or based on your uneducated opinion.

    I suggest you go and read on what is happening with computer technology and in the development of the cloud software (not just data storage, check out how Microsoft now offer their office software) and also the future of entertainment, medicine, education and gaming, because you haven’t got a clue. These developments are all well underway so Information is not hard to find.

    I am normally happy to argue with you on most topics mate but there is no point when you just reply off the top of your head in favour of your preferred media company and political team….Stop guessing it’s all as your spin doctors tell you and learn a small bit, then you might make an argument on this issue.

  32. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy

    Is this the future you want:

    How to keep the future at arm’s length.

    While it’s fun to talk about the home of the future, in many ways Jon Oxer, who opens his front door using a chip that he implanted in his arm, is already there.

    The 42-year-old computer programmer from Croydon South in Melbourne has almost his entire house connected to his home network, and everything can be monitored and controlled via the internet.

    This includes lights, curtains, door locks, fans, irrigation system, window winders, security cameras, motion detectors, letterbox, doorbell, water tank level sensors, smoke detectors, wall-mounted Android tablets, light switches, garden gate sensors, home entertainment system and more.

    Oxer has even repurposed Microsoft’s Xbox Kinect motion-sensing accessory to allow him to open and close his curtains using hand gestures.

    “Individual items connected to a home automation system don’t seem particularly interesting or ground-breaking, but the benefit comes from … the combination of devices and the interaction between them,” he says.

    “For example, triggering a smoke detector can cause all the lights to be turned on and the doors unlocked. Leaving the house and touching a control on your smartphone can cause the house to turn off every light, lock all the doors, close the windows, and close the curtains.”

    As for the NBN he said “it’s a case of build it, and ideas will come”. Oxer said he could immediately benefit from a 100Mbps connection.

    “I work from home on a wide range of projects, so every day I have to share large files including CAD files, high-res images, and video with customers and suppliers all over the world via the internet,” he says.

    Oxer also produces an online show called SuperHouseTV and it often takes eight hours or more to upload an episode as a high definition video file to YouTube.

    “If I could upload video more quickly it would be much easier to publish episodes frequently, and perhaps to experiment with unusual show formats such as having interactive episodes involving viewers, like talkback TV.”

    Read more: http://www.theage.com.au/technology/technology-news/building-todays-tech-tomorrow-20130412-2hqt0.html#ixzz2QJAmvapm

    My starting point on this issue is one of what do we NEED of what all this technology offers rather than the Gee wizz we can do so and so and there fore we HAVE to do it.
    From what you have said over the years you personally live a rather lowtech lifestyle away form your workplace so can I ask you how automated you want your house to be? Do you want access to that house to be dependant upon a microchip in your hand? Do you want a fridge that orders your groceries and decides what you eat? Do you want a car that reports to head office about the way that you drive or to the police exactly where you go? Do you want you TV to report to the government or business about who watches what in your lounge room to personalise the advertising? Do you want the energy companies to know how long you spend in the shower? Perhaps you would be happy to have a bed that records your love life? All of these things are possible and in some way suggested by the possibilities of the new technology but how much of it would really make your life better?

  33. GD says:

    Do you want a fridge that orders your groceries

    Damn right I want one of them, and a flying car, but more about that later 🙂

  34. GD says:

    I agree with you Craigy. You raise many worthwhile points. As an early adopter of internet technology, I wholeheartedly agree with the ‘need for speed’ and also envision a future based not only on the ongoing advances being made in this field, but also based upon what can be imagined.

    However, altruism, vision and wishful thinking won’t put fibre-optic cable underground or overhead across Australia without massive expenditure.

    As I said before, the current estimate to realise Labor’s NBN is $94 billion dollars. It was originally budgeted at $37 billion. Fair enough that national infrastructure projects blow out on cost, but considering the lacklustre uptake of ‘fibre to the home’, at last count Senator Conroy couldn’t even answer the question.

    GD, can you tell me what it is going to cost to upgrade the Turnbull NBN when it becomes too slow in about 10 years time?

    I can’t, and neither can you. I would suspect that by saving money from Labor’s projected $94 billion cost, that Turnbull’s NBN will be able to not only upgrade but also take advantage of a further decade of research and technological development.

    The NBN isn’t the Sydney Harbour Bridge or the Snowy River Scheme, it is not set in stone.

    Based on Conroy’s track record, the NBN won’t be finished in ten years. Based on realistic estimates, it will be sometime in the 2020s, possibly 2030.

    Based on the track record of previous technological advances, it is unlikely that Conroy’s NBN will be cutting edge technology even in the next few decades. The Coalition recognises this and rather than being short-sighted is actually taking the long view.

    Committing less money now while ensuring that there are funds for further development and expansion is surely the most sensible, pragmatic and affordable solution.

    Remember, even if Labor were to be re-elected, they have no money in the coffers to pay for this pie-in-the-sky scheme. They’ve blown it all on mismanagement and wasteful green schemes.

    With an aging population, a huge amount of research money is going into on-line medicine. The faster the speeds into people’s homes the more efficiently we can get from this.

    This is another pipe-dream, another item on the proverbial wish list along with flying cars. While it is possible, as flying cars are, it is as useful to the general population as a tax rebate for millionaires.

    I’m probably older than you, Craigy. While people my age are internet wise, and relatives now in their eighties are happily emailing, sending pics and answering their smart phones, it will a long time before any of us go online for a diagnosis.

    Sure we google stuff, but when it comes down to an emergency, we turn to the excellent services offered by 000. An online diagnosis can only ever offer an opinion.

    I’d prefer a flying car.

  35. Craigy says:

    Yes Iain, I am not the person who wants all that stuff, but I do want to be able to upload video and research etc…..And my kids want all of it.

    Will it make a better world? Who knows, it won’t be up to you or I….But all of this is coming and more…..

    Down here, even our electricity meters are smart with built in Wi-Fi already….I guess the important thing for you and your kids is that this is the future of our economy, without technology we will be left behind the rest of Asia and the rest of the world.

    GD, it is not a pipe dream (I’m 49 years old, just so you know)……Remote medicine is right at the top of the list in terms of research and development investment as we speak, as is remote education……..If I am to get reasonable medical treatment in my 60’s and beyond, I will need this to be available in the public system.

    Remember, your side of the fence, once in power, favours a user pays world and medical costs more than most of us (without private insurance) can afford. The more efficient it is the more we can afford….That’s why it’s a priority NOW…..The population is aging…

  36. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy

    Yes Iain, I am not the person who wants all that stuff, but I do want to be able to upload video and research etc…..And my kids want all of it.

    Yes I appreciate that you want to upload video, but if the coalition option incapable of simultaneously downloading 4 HD video streams then surely that means it could upload one stream ant X4 normal speed. Some how I suspect that would be better than your current internet. Your kids may want “all of it” but the way the polls are its going to be make do with the Coalition’s offerings or try smoke signals isn’t it?
    As I have been saying for years Labor in particular and the left in general are great at coming up with sweet sounding ideas , but utterly crap at delivering them. Frankly its like the way that people complain about our roads, when you look at the mileage in our road network and our population I think our roads are OK. The same rubric applies to our broadband network we can’t afford an autobahn to every house but then again most of us are happy if the road to our door is just sealed and serviceable in all weathers

    Will it make a better world? Who knows, it won’t be up to you or I….But all of this is coming and more…..

    Now that is the wrong attitude just because we are older does not mean that we don’t have some useful insights to share about the way that lives are lead?

    Down here, even our electricity meters are smart with built in Wi-Fi already….I guess the important thing for you and your kids is that this is the future of our economy, without technology we will be left behind the rest of Asia and the rest of the world.

    Call me a Luddite if you like but I would not of necessity see that as a good thing beside the fact that there are some people in Victoria who are very unhappy with the way that the new smart meters have been rolled out(and the fee for installing them) but also its just another way the big business are making more workers redundant. Our young people may love the toys but if the price is an ever shrinking Job market what are the social benefits of those toys again?
    Just a final point, as I understand it, your meters rely on signals sent through the power network itself rather than having any connection to the internet.

  37. Iain Hall says:

    Oh and on the medicine front maybe you should consider moving to Queensland where we have had a free public hospital system since before I arrived here in 1963, heck I even got into the pain clinic after a very modest two year wait 😉

  38. GD says:

    GD, it is not a pipe dream (I’m 49 years old, just so you know)……Remote medicine is right at the top of the list in terms of research and development investment as we speak, as is remote education……..If I am to get reasonable medical treatment in my 60′s and beyond, I will need this to be available in the public system.

    Craigy, once again, I agree with your wish list, but question the need to immediately implement your ideas. It seems that pragmatism is a term the greens and lefties don’t understand.

    So just for the fun of it, let’s ‘unpack’ your wish list.

    (I’m 49 years old, just so you know)

    We already knew that. You’re obviously a youngster, but we won’t hold that against you. 🙂

    Remote medicine is right at the top of the list in terms of research and development investment as we speak

    It would help if you could provide citations or evidence of this.

    as is remote education

    Remote education is already available from most universities in Australia. I fail to see how face-to-face interaction would be any more beneficial than the currently successful model of forum based interaction. And the reason? Most students, whether now or in the near future, won’t be able to afford the NBN rates for an, as yet unrealised, instant video hookup.

    As for medical consultations, yes, one day they could be conducted via the internet. But to what purpose? Will we be provided with a special keypad to take our blood pressure, another to prick our finger to take a blood sample to test for diabetes, cholesterol, prostate cancer and myriad other afflictions? I shudder to think how women will be tested for breast cancer.

    Craigy, I reckon when you’re sixty, you’ll much prefer having a GP around the corner, with a specialist on tap, rather than a video hookup with a doctor in India.

    Craigy your wish list is just that, a wish list. And having a wish list is a wonderful thing, but please don’t support a crazy government that only deals in wish lists and fails to deliver a pragmatic program to provide them.

  39. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy You might be interested in this:

    The consultants highlight that uses that would drive mass-market demand are fundamental to the economics of the NBN because it is a mass-market fibre network of “great scale”.

    “No one has yet been able to articulate the high bandwidth applications that will drive demand for mass-market FTTP capacity, particularly applications that promote productivity and social utility,” they say. “Super high-definition television should not be (the) rationale for an investment of this scale.”

    The NBN should not be set up for the “highest common denominator home user” and while there are certainly members of the public in audio-visual creative industries, “this is a small fraction of the population”.

    The NBN Co’s blog says Australians have been enthusiastic adopters of smart TVs, tablets, set-top boxes and game consoles and this country is “fertile ground” for broadcast TV content streamed live over the internet using the NBN.

    The blog also boasts that the NBN will be able to deliver “4K” TV — ultra-high definition TV that quadruples the highest resolution available.


    from Here

  40. Craigy says:

    Iain, of course the Australian will say that, it’s defending it’s bosses business…..Again you show your lack of knowledge…..4 streams of compressed HD video, to watch movies at home is one thing, but for content producers/directors and editors including animators (3D and graphical) they need to send uncompressed files that can be 10 times larger.

    Also, look into upload speeds and the difference between the full NBN and the crappy system that the LNP wants to burden us with and you will soon see why it’s a lemon….Uploads of simple compressed HD video to youtube can take 8 hours for just one program…..You really need to learn a bit more about the technology that is widely in use already…..Your just behind the times old mate….

    GD, is isn’t a wish list, real money is being spent on all this stuff now….I’m not going to spend my time pointing you and Iain to all the projects underway…..Go and read a bit, and not just from News Ltd, and you might learn a thing or two….

    I wish I was feeling like a youngster GD, but some recent nasty health issues have me feeling older than I should….

  41. Craigy says:

    sorry about the typo’s in my last post …in a hurry…

  42. Craigy says:

    Oh and to answer your point about smart-meters…. I’ll give you a clue…..Why does a smart meter have a Wi-Fi connection? Because it can talk to many of the devices in your home (or will able to do that soon)….How do those devices connect to the internet….via your homes internet connection……Sorry I didn’t make that clear, but again your lack of knowledge in this area is the problem here….I suggest again that you read some more before opining on this topic like you actually know something about it…Reading News ltd for you information will only make you look ill-informed and therefore a bit silly…

  43. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy

    Iain, of course the Australian will say that, it’s defending it’s bosses business…..Again you show your lack of knowledge…..4 streams of compressed HD video, to watch movies at home is one thing, but for content producers/directors and editors including animators (3D and graphical) they need to send uncompressed files that can be 10 times larger.

    Well for the small number pf people in that category they can pay extra for the speedand bandwidth that they want can’t they? Why should everyone subsidise that small minority of users who will have agenuine need for that sort of band width?

    Also, look into upload speeds and the difference between the full NBN and the crappy system that the LNP wants to burden us with and you will soon see why it’s a lemon….Uploads of simple compressed HD video to youtube can take 8 hours for just one program…..You really need to learn a bit more about the technology that is widely in use already…..Your just behind the times old mate….

    Maybe you need to take a small step back from your own self interest here ant think about what the average family wants and needs rather than seeing everything through the rubric of the industry you work in?

  44. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy
    We don’t have those sorts of meters here so I have been going on the scant media reports that I have seen on the subject. That said if what you describe is the case I reckon that its a horrible prospect. I do not like the idea of any distant computer having access to or control of the appliances in my house. I may be a bit quaint for you but maybe you should watch or read a bit of science fiction where issues about automation and the march of technology is quite well explored I recommend Phillip K Dick and Isaac Asimov as a good starting point.

  45. Craigy says:

    “Maybe you need to take a small step back from your own self interest here ant think about what the average family wants and needs”

    There are examples of the value of the NBN from just about every industry Iain, you know, the industries that employ those average families.

    re-smart meters, don’t get me wrong Iain, I don’t like it either but both sides of the political fence support them so your point is moot….

  46. Iain Hall says:

    Maybe from industry Craigy but I am thinking from the point of view of the ordinary person
    As or the smart meters we don’t have them here and I will do my darndest to try to keep them away for as long as possible 😉

  47. GD says:

    Craigy, please refrain from suggesting that Iain and his conservative commenters glean their information exclusively from News Ltd.

    It’s a bit like saying that all your info comes from the Green Left Weekly or the Age.

    Mind you, News Ltd is a far more reliable, readable and engaging source that either of those two. 🙂

  48. Richard Ryan says:

    Communication heading backwards under Liberal rule. Bunnings stockpile of balls of string and empty cans running out fast. Don’t miss out get there fast.

  49. Iain Hall says:

    Richard
    Just what sort of internet connection do you have now and how much data do you use a month?

  50. […] A broadband Ford in every household (iainhall.wordpress.com) […]

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