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Chemotherapy and the Easter bunny

 Prime Minister Julia Gillard welcomed 2Day FM crew Kyle Sandalands and Jackie O to Kirribilli House with kids from the Bear Cottage charity. Picture: Sam Mooy Source: The Daily Telegraph

Prime Minister Julia Gillard welcomed 2Day FM crew Kyle Sandalands and Jackie O to Kirribilli House with kids from the Bear Cottage charity. Picture: Sam Mooy Source: The Daily Telegraph

I am eternally thankful that my fellow  Sandpit authors have given us their perspectives on the  failed coup and its aftermath because I  have been at both horrified and rather to bemused to write anything substantive about the whole sorry mess and I have been trying to avoid letting my personal feelings of Schadenfreude cloud my judgement over the implosion of the Labor party. Its just too delicious when a bad government turns upon itself  and is so obviously committing a very public act of political suicide.  Now for a government that claims  not to to be in campaign mode the stunts and pork barrelling  are starting to c0me  thick and fast. With Gillard promising millions for schools up here in sunny Queensland  and we will see an unending litany of similar promises where ever the blighted one appears to spruik  her political potions.  The new cabinet announcement will be an interesting thing to watch and I expect that those elevated to, a hem, greatness will all struggle to hold their seats as a consequence of drinking deep from Gillard’s Koolaid  but I suppose that they can take some comfort from the beneficial effect that their brief elevation to the ministry will have on their superannuation when they join the ranks of the unemployed after September 14. When you are living in gloomy times there is no doubt that you will enjoy even the most fleeting moments of sunshine even when omens foretell  that eternal darkness is but a few short weeks away.

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With that in mind I am of course not at all surprised that there are moves a foot to encourage Brother Number One to totally leave to political stage and either quit or lose his seat in the house. Personally I can understand the reason that the Gillard Glee Club would want all trace of the once and future leader erased from the timeline but I also expect that a man of  Rudd’s ego will not go quietly under any circumstance.  One who appears to being coerced to stay though is the leader of government business in the house Anthony Albanese  who is just too valuable to the Gillard  crew to be allowed to fall on his sword in the same way that fellow Ruddites have done over the last few days. Its a measure of the lack of moral turpitude in the Labor party that even in total victory of the the forces of the Rudd push that Gillard has to hold on to Albanese like grim death because they have no one in their camp who can do what he does in the house.  Yet another example of the way that this government is driven by only one thing and that is to preserve the current power and status of its  leader and to pretend that the future  of the party does not matter in the least.

The Easter festival  has always been about renewal even before it was assimilated into Christian mythology and I can appreciate the value of such a festival in the cycle of the seasons but for Labor I see it as being about death without the possibility of resurrection, of a tomb that will not be empty on the third day and that the sightings of  a risen saviour will all be the desperate delusions  of the faithful who have all but lost their religion and who chant the litany even though their hearts are not in it any more. Take heart though Comrades because there is hope that what will die in September will be the the worst aspects of the the once admirable Labor party and that which  will be resurrected and nurtured in the wilderness  of opposition will be  a party that is relevant to today and the changing face of the Australian electorate rather than a slave to the unions and their outdated socialism and class warfare mantras. Then again such political cancers are incredibly hard to kill so I won’t be holding my breath waiting for the electoral Chemotherapy to work.

Cheers Comrades

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53 Comments

  1. Mr Albasneezey is a very smart man, he may look like my rear end, but he knows his pension depends on me allowing him to continue to hack away at ‘Pyne’ trees, keep the Mad monk mad and check mate the Bishop, Truss me, he’s also an excellent Hockey player.

    He’s fallen in line after my threats very nicely and he will be the corner stone that sees Kevin and I hrudle head first to an unprecedented result in September, well maybe July, could be August, it depends when Tony wants the election.

  2. Ray Dixon says:

    Does Greg Combet realise the irony in this statement (about Rudd)?

    “The concept that has developed in recent years .. that somehow or other it’s legitimate to deliberately undermine and destabilise your own side of politics, to undermine your own leader, your own political party, particularly while it’s in government, so that you can bring about some leadership change – I think is a disgusting disgrace.”

    Yes, I think it started in 2010 – around June.

  3. Dear Mr Toxon, I absolutely refute any ossettions you make here that Bug eyes has anything to do with Kevins ironing and he certainly hasn’t been doing the laundry for Kevin or anyone else in my house since 2010. Gregory has been weened off wasting water and the use of chemicals of any description and we have put him on a strictly Carbon diet.

    I think that you should be more interested and excited when I make one of my rare appearances at a press conference today.

    As I once heard my fellow Labor/Independent Andrew Wilkie say at the Hobart Casino, I will be declaring my hand shortly as to what is in my new cabinet, that’s when the carpenters have finished repairing the unique revolving doors.
    Apart from the usual bottles of scotch, cans of rum and cola mixers that you find in any good grog cabinet, oops wrong cabinet, I will put on display fresh, intelligent new amateurs who will loyally assist me in dragging the Labor name, the Labor brand as far along the gutter as we can.

    I will at this time however not speculate on who by the way, will be apart of the B team, oops, sorry, I’ve just been advised we are now on the y team, forgot about all the earlier teams we’ve fielded.

  4. Craigy says:

    Ray,

    I didn’t see Julia’s team undermining Rudd, he did that all himself. You clearly don’t want to admit that he wasn’t a good leader…..

    Combet is talking about things like the leaks during the last election etc…

    Rudd is gone for now, if you want Tony as PM you couldn’t be doing more to make it happen….Are you going to vote for him?…Because politics is about a bit more than just the party leader….Don’t you think?

  5. Craigy says:

    Juliar Blowhard,

    Why is it that when those on the right try to be funny (or use satire) they fail so completely?…..Lame….so very lame…..

  6. Dear Mr Thomson, oops, Çraigy’, of well the cats out of the bag now I guess, I am at all times serious, why Tony and Julie and Russell and so many more keep saying that I am doing such seriously damaging things, so I guess that’s why, I’ll have to lighten up a bit I guess, and show my funny side. I’ll get back to you when someone finds it for me, Kevie ……………

  7. Brian says:

    Rudd is one of the great mysteries of Australian politics. Most of the Australian people want him as prime minister, but most in his own party wouldn’t touch him with a barge pole. It seems clear that while Rudd is a very intelligent man with strong credentials to be PM, he is also an office tyrant who not many want to work with or for. Which only goes to show that leadership is a game of many parts and you need all of them in working order.

    “Juliar Blowhard”, some people have a knack for political satire, mimicry and humour. Sadly, you are not one of them.

  8. Ray Dixon says:

    Rudd is gone for now, if you want Tony as PM you couldn’t be doing more to make it happen

    What a ridiculous assertion/analysis. Rudd was the ALP’s last hope of making the election a real contest and that’s regardless of his management ‘style’, his so-called inability to work with subordinates (who are subordinate for a reason) or his so-called ‘office manners’ – who gives a shit about all that? It’s Gillard and her aides who have handed Abbott the election on a platter and it wouldn’t matter how much everyone (including me) ‘gets behind’ her … she’s got no hope, Craigy. We’re talking a primary vote around 25% here. Disaster.

  9. Thank you Bryan for your resounding endorsement. I also find your comments about my first best mate Kelvin hysterical, hilarious. Such incite that he was once an intelligent man, the Genghis Khan of the house in the hill and is loved and adored by all of us who have worked with him, shows that there are indeed some great minds like mine at work here on Andrew Bolt’s Sandbox.

  10. Ray Dixon says:

    Gillard says she’s “appalled” with last week’s events – that the party was “self-indulgent”. Perhaps she should have added that the party (under her leadership) has “lost its way”.

  11. Iain Hall says:

    Yes her claiming to be a victim is rather disingenuous if you ask me.

  12. Brian says:

    Rudd was the ALP’s last hope of making the election a real contest and that’s regardless of his management ‘style’, his so-called inability to work with subordinates (who are subordinate for a reason) or his so-called ‘office manners’ – who gives a shit about all that?

    Two-thirds of the ALP caucus apparently.

  13. Iain Hall says:

    With Gillard 2/3 of the voters don’t want her, which sort of trumps any concerns about office manners in my book Brian

  14. Brian says:

    There is no trumping involved Iain. This isn’t the US where the public votes for the president. It’s one of the vagaries of the Westminster system that the leader of the majority party is also the leader of the government. If the majority party don’t want Rudd as their leader then he’s not the leader of the government. The same applies to Turnbull, who I suspect more Australians would prefer as PM than Abbott.

  15. Iain Hall says:

    I well understand how things work here but I also see the interesting coincidence that the same proportion of Labor members don’t want to work with Rudd as there are Australian voters who don’t want Gillard

  16. Brian says:

    You may well understand how things work but you’re being deliberately obtuse if you’re arguing that Gillard must accede to Rudd because he’s more popular with the public. Westminster politics has never worked that way. Did Chamberlain give way to Churchill in 1938, when Winny was on the back-benches but probably more popular with the public? No. The nature of our political system, rightly or wrongly, is that parties dominate the whole thing. And the workings of those parties are sometimes a closed book. Public perceptions or opinions does not come into it.

    We don’t know for certain why the ALP doesn’t want Rudd as its leader and I doubt we will, not until the obligatory round of retirements followed by hardcover biographies. But I very much doubt that two thirds of the ALP caucus are blind; the guy must have serious issues if they won’t go back to him, even if it will deliver them much better prospects in September.

  17. Iain Hall says:

    Brian
    Don’t get me wrong as someone who wants the coalition to win the next election convincingly I am nothing but delighted that Gillard has prevailed over Rudd. Quite simply under her leadership Labor are going to decimated. As for the post hoc self justifications (hard or soft cover) well I for one won’t be wasting my money on them. I’ll leave that to the Labor Tragics like Ray.

  18. Brian says:

    A wise move Iain; I certainly won’t be spending one cent on them either. I expect the media will save us the trouble by picking them apart and report on them. But my point is until then, we will never fully know who did what and why. All we do know for certain is that Rudd is about as popular in caucus as a blister on the end of your tossle.

  19. Iain Hall says:

    If they come out as a free download to my e reader I might be tempted to read one or two but I also know that such books are usually rather lacking in brutal self awareness.

  20. Craigy says:

    “What a ridiculous assertion/analysis. Rudd was the ALP’s last hope of making the election a real contest and that’s regardless of his management ‘style’”

    Well Ray, I guess, without wanting to upset you, I will just point out that your analysis/predictions have turned out to be ‘cough cough’ not exactly accurate so far….so I will take your comments on Rudd’s hope of winning another election with a grain of salt if you don’t mind…..And we will wait and see how the ALP goes in 6 months time….

    My point is valid though, if you support the ALP then you should forget about Rudd and continue discussing the non-policies of Tony Abbott and the damage he will do to our country and economy. You sound more credible when you are doing that….

  21. Ray Dixon says:

    I wouldn’t read anyone’s biography – what’s to be learnt from someone writing their own self-interested version of history? Lance Armstrong’s books are now regarded as fiction, although our local book shop has labelled it “Crime stories”.

    As for the “overwhelming” hatred of Rudd in Caucus, it’s reported that he had as many as 46 of the 100 votes, and that’s without lobbying (Rudd couldn’t lobby because, if he had, he’d again have been accused of ‘destabilising’ the party). The point is, there were/are hardly “2/3 rds of caucus” against him.

  22. Ray Dixon says:

    What predictions have I made, Craigy? Saying that Rudd would go closer than Gillard is not a “prediction”, it’s an opinion based on 27 documented opinion polls. Whereas your opinion that Gillard can win is indeed a (rather odd) prediction that looks like being wrong.

    And I’m not a paid-up supporter of any party and, as much as I reckon Abbott will be a train wreck too, I certainly don’t support the continuation of the Gillard government. I repeat – the people who are handing Abbott the Lodge are the ones in Gillard’s inner sanctum. Don’t expect me to do their bidding for them – they don’t deserve any help.

  23. Craigy says:

    Oh Ray come on….I may have not been commenting but I have been reading your predictions of a Rudd return for the last two years…..you still think he is going to challenge…Sheesh….Getting it wrong is a habit of yours of late…The only reason Rudd might have got the numbers you quote above is because there is no other option, not because they like him as a leader, Brian is right on that one.

    And really, all this is Gillard’s fault? Rudd had nothing to do with the leaks and had no help undermining the PM??…I guess all those ministers that have just stepped down had misused their taxi dockets or something hey?

    BTW. I never said I thought the ALP will win the next election…I wouldn’t be silly enough or arrogant enough to make predictions in this climate. My gut feeling tells me it COULD be a lot closer once Abbott is exposed in public to some scrutiny….Look at how he even managed to put his foot in his mouth last week during the apology to the adopted folk…..The ALP may not win but I can’t see a landslide while Tony’s the only option…

    The Green’s…..Tracking nice at 10% but I admit they may lose a few if the ALP takes a hammering (due to preferences). Unlikely – unless Turnbull makes a come back.

  24. Brian says:

    I wouldn’t read anyone’s biography – what’s to be learnt from someone writing their own self-interested version of history? As for the “overwhelming” hatred of Rudd in Caucus, it’s reported that he had as many as 46 of the 100 votes

    So you’d ignore the personal account of someone directly involved in the events concerned, on the grounds it might be biased, yet you’re prepared to accept guesswork about numbers from journalists? That makes no sense whatsoever.

    What all the smoke clears, the following things are certain. Kevin Rudd was dumped by the ALP caucus in 2010. He has twice had the opportunity to challenge Gillard; both times he did not have the numbers. It’s time those inclined to support the ALP forgot about Kevin Rudd and focused on the real issues.

  25. Gentlemen Gentlemen, please don’t argue over my dead body, my book is out there and there are vast quantities available, I believe we’ve sold 2 so far, Kevlar and Timmy both bought copies. What a wonderful transparent title – The Making of JULIA Blowhard – Prime Minister;

  26. Iain Hall says:

    Well at least you did not get Jo Chandler to write the book Juliar 😉

  27. Ray Dixon says:

    Brian, it wasn’t “guess work from journalists” – the 46 vote estimate came from those involved, from Bowen & Rudd.

    Craigy, being wrong about Rudd being reinstated does not disqualify my opinion on other matters. And this particular spill was not as a result of any undermining by Rudd. It came about because Gillard is facing certain defeat, by a pretty big margin, and Rudd was the only hope of salvaging something. He didn’t instigate it – Simon Crean (Gillard’s closest ally) did, remember?

  28. Iain Hall says:

    I have to agree with Ray in one thing Brian the Polls have consistently shown Rudd more preferred than Gillard as PM so its not unreasonable to advocate that he is likely to perform better than Gillard in a general election However its also rather like playing fantasy football and thinking that the result you get in your imaginary games can affect the real competition.

  29. Brian says:

    I know Iain, I’ve never disputed that. But polls don’t determine the leader of the government or a particular political party, which was the point I made earlier. And Rudd’s numbers are neither here nor there. He has now been rolled three times: once by Gillard when he resigned as PM, again by Gillard last year and now by Gillard again. Politics is a numbers game and Rudd hasn’t had the numbers since 2007. The fact we’re still talking about him six years on, when there’s a country to run and an election to prepare for, is ridiculous.

    For what it’s worth, in my view Gillard has to go to the 2013 election and take full responsibility for the outcome there. If Rudd had taken over now it would have clouded the issue of who was responsible for the thrashing that Labor is likely to get. Rudd would have blamed Gillard, Gillard would have blamed Rudd, and the ALP would still be a house divided against itself. It’s better for the party to push on and take its medicine, then set about giving itself a good enema.

  30. Iain Hall says:

    Yeah I think that you are right about that Brian and it fits with my belief that Rudd’s vision for his future is more about reforming the party after its defeat than ever being PM again and to be leader that goes into defeat in September would make becoming the party saviour more difficult,

  31. GD says:

    Craigy said:

    My gut feeling tells me it COULD be a lot closer once Abbott is exposed in public to some scrutiny….Look at how he even managed to put his foot in his mouth last week during the apology to the adopted folk

    Tony Abbott did not mis-speak, nor ‘put his foot in it’, he used the words ‘birth parents’. Should he have used the term ‘biological parents’?

    This faux outrage by the left at the use of legitimate terminology is pathetic. The politically correct over-reaction is also hypocritical considering the leftist media’s use of the same terminology.

    Bettina Arndt agrees, she says ‘today’s policies are tomorrow’s apologies’.

    What is it with the left that they have to ‘re-write’ history, and with the hindsight of ’20-20′ vision, apologise for past injustices that they imagine occurred? Perhaps it’s another way of justifying their current (failed) attempts to control society.

    Many of us who grew up in the 60s and early 70s had friends that were adopted. It was a common experience and common knowledge. The adoptive parents didn’t hide it from their kids or the community. In cases I knew of, these kids couldn’t have ended up with better families.

    In the 80s I was engaged to a beautiful, successful woman. She was adopted. Both she and her parents were proud of it.

    Why is it the left seek to stigmatise this very humane tradition of placing children born to parents incapable of caring for them with a caring couple who are unable to have children?

    Instead, the left champion artificially inseminated pregnancies with third and fourth parties to pretend that gay couples are ‘parents’.

    Paradoxically, the left, and the Greens in particular, champion abortion.

    Go figure! 😦

  32. Ray Dixon says:

    You’re trying too hard to defend Abbott, GD. Much harder than he is, in fact. Look, just tell Craigy the bloody obvious: It doesn’t matter how Abbott is portrayed by Gillard or by even the media from now on. This election is about how the public see Gillard and the ALP …. and judging by the latest poll with the coalition at 50% primary vote and the Govt at 30%, and a two party preferred of 58 – 42, what I’ve just said looks exactly right. Craigy is dreaming if he thinks this election will be anything but a wipeout.

  33. Iain Hall says:

    My prediction is that the ALP dirt unit will be in overdrive, even though such tactics did not save Anna Bligh.

  34. Brian says:

    It’s a bit rich hearing you talking about the “ALP dirt unit” when the Liberal Party’s own dirt unit, staffed by Bishop, Bolt and Pickering (not to mention Hall) has been spent the last 12 months dredging up the Slater & Gordon non-issue.

  35. Iain Hall says:

    Brian
    I have never seen the Slater and Gordon matter as anything more than an interesting aside in the greater scheme of things.

  36. Brian says:

    Sideshow or not, you and your trusty Lib-loving lieutenant “GD” have blogged / commented about it several times.

  37. Iain Hall says:

    Of course I have covered it here its been a rather juicy gossip-fest and a good insight into the moral centre of our current PM

  38. Brian says:

    So in other words, it’s an exercise in flinging mud to sully Gillard’s personal reputation as well as her political one.

    When Labor engages in this, as they sometimes do, then you call it a “dirt unit”. But when you do it, well it’s no big deal and all just a bit of fun. What a reeking double standard.

  39. Iain Hall says:

    Brian
    I make no secret of my belief that all politics is a game and one in which I have a favoured team, This blog is partisan and has no pretensions at all of being ‘UNBIASED” so there is no double standard at all. In fact I will welcome guest posts from anyone who wants to defend the government but I suspect that there won’t be that many takers.

  40. GD says:

    Brian

    It’s a bit rich hearing you talking about the “ALP dirt unit” when the Liberal Party’s own dirt unit, staffed by Bishop, Bolt and Pickering (not to mention Hall) has been spent the last 12 months dredging up the Slater & Gordon non-issue.

    Joolia Gillard misappropriates moneys in her role as a solicitor and could be facing legal action. Tony Abbott refers to ‘birth parents’ and the sh*t hits the fan.

    This is the difference with Labor and Liberal.

    Would you like some more examples?

  41. Brian says:

    It’s not about “defending the government”, Iain. It’s about being fair to all parties and making claims based on evidence rather than supposition and personal hatred. You might think that slinging mud for your side of politics is just a game, and that’s fair enough. Just don’t get high and mighty when the other side of politics does it back.

    “GD”, I have no idea about the “birth parents” thing but it sounds like nothing. As for Julia Gillard, there is no evidence she misappropriated money OR that she is likely to face legal action. You and your mates are just pissing in the wind.

  42. Ray Dixon says:

    GD’s comment is actually defamatory. It’s not real clever to publish allegations like that about a lawyer, let alone a Prime Minister.

  43. Iain Hall says:

    No Brian I’m not saying that slinging mud in the name of politics is the game,I am saying that all participants in our democracy are players in a big game. Its a very serious game but a game none the less.

  44. Brian says:

    Perhaps. But you used the phrase “dirt unit”, as though it’s something Labor does that the other side of politics doesn’t. That itself is a joke. Your dirt unit is just as big and nasty as our dirt unit, I’d warrant.

    Would Julia bother sueing “GD”? Does he have anything worth sueing for? Stay tuned for answers to these compelling questions.

  45. Ray Dixon says:

    GD would call it “censorship”.

  46. Iain Hall says:

    Brian
    I don’t deny that the Coalition do research on the background of Labor figures however what I was alluding to was the attempt by Bligh staffers to blacken Newman’s name in the campaign once they had nothing else to use in a desperate attempt to save Bligh, frankly I was just trying to point out how desperate they are rather than trying to denounce the the existence or operation of a dirt unit.

  47. GD says:

    Fellas, report me! You know my name, look up the number and tell the Feds. FFS!

    Brian

    “GD”, I have no idea about the “birth parents” thing but it sounds like nothing

    Obviously, and so your comments aren’t relevant.

  48. Brian says:

    What, because you make some limp reference to something I’ve not heard about, that somehow makes my point irrelevant? You were absent from school the day they taught logic, weren’t you?

    I don’t deny that the Coalition do research on the background of Labor figures

    Even your phrasing gives you away Iain. It’s not “research”, it’s mud-slinging. Both sides of politics do it. Do yourself a favour, as Molly would say, and admit that your own beloved Libs are up to the same dirty tricks. It will liberate you.

  49. Craigy says:

    Nice attempt at a bait and switch GD…well done…

    It doesn’t change the fact that every time Abbott opens his mouth he sticks his foot in it. In this case he got booed…..And Gillard had the good grace to praise him on radio later for the way he apologised for using the wrong words….No leftist attack there, your strawman has failed again….

  50. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy
    why do you assume that the heckler was in the right in that instance?
    Personally I think that she was being a rather obnoxious bitch to interrupt the speech. and the words were in no sense ‘wrong” just because they upset this one woman.

  51. Craigy says:

    It was more than one woman Iain, and Tony apologised…funny about that…

  52. GD says:

    Tony didn’t use the wrong words, Craigy. He shouldn’t have apologised.

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