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Legal Good time, Legal lime time, and Justice

One of my passions is justice and I suppose my view of what is actaully just is very much a product of my life experience and I expect that I’m much like most people in that respect. Unlike some on in the profession of getting Crims off so that they can minimise the consequences of their abhorrent social behaviour I don’t actaully have much time for the excuse that some sort of mood disorder like depression should be used as an argument in mitigation when they are being sentenced:

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Even those with mood disorders like depression know the difference between right and wrong and really only those people suffering from mental illnesses severe enough to totally  destroy their reason deserve to get substantial leniency for their criminal acts.

Perhaps the time has come to make it clear that such excuses are actaully just bullshit invented by the whores of the legal, profession (members of the Bar) who spend their time grasping at any reason to argue that their criminal clients should get a lighter sentence than they deserve, worse still are the judges who buy into such bullshit and provided the leniency sought by members of the oldest legal profession.

Cheers Comrades

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6 Comments

  1. The Griper says:

    go a little deeper and you’ll see the idea that behavior is “determined” rather than an act of “free will” being used as the defense and the courts are buying this argument.

  2. Craigy says:

    “Even those with mood disorders like depression know the difference between right and wrong and really only those people suffering from mental illnesses severe enough to totally destroy their reason deserve to get substantial leniency for their criminal acts”

    Are you talking about all forms of depression Iain? Because some forms of depression are not just mood disorders but actual mental illness. I think this is what makes it so hard for judges and prosecutors. No one wants to jail someone who has actually been suffering uncontrolled behaviour. They tend to be victims rather than perpetrators most of the time.

    http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/depression/complete-index.shtml

    You can see why it is a popular defence, but each case needs to be looked at on merit. Perhaps the courts need better advice when assessing mental illness. I don’t think you can say that one form of depression can be used and not another…..Hmmmm.

  3. Craigy says:

    Oh and I think the epidemic of recent suicides attributed to depression (and grief) points to the fact that it can be the most serous of illness. Don’t you think that makes it harder for the legal’s to deal with?

  4. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy
    Sadly I do know a little bit about the effects of depression and I did make it clear in my post that I am quite willing to accept that some types of mental illness are legitimate reasons to ask for leniency when someone is facing sentence for wrong doing but I just think that its just too easy to discover that a crim has “depression” and to use that as an excuse for a whole swag of unacceptable behaviour.

  5. Iain Hall says:

    Craigy

    Oh and I think the epidemic of recent suicides attributed to depression (and grief) points to the fact that it can be the most serous of illness. Don’t you think that makes it harder for the legal’s to deal with?

    Depressives have been topping themselves for as long as history and I have had experience of that right up close to be honest I doubt that its any more common now than it has ever been. We certainly hear about it more now that suicide is not seen as being so shameful.

  6. Craigy says:

    Agree with your points Iain. We have had four in our area this year….very sad.

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