Iain Hall's SANDPIT

Home » AGW and climate change » Germany Faces Energy Disaster and our Greens Follow Blindly

Germany Faces Energy Disaster and our Greens Follow Blindly

German media ‘Die Welt’ reports:

Germany only just escaped large-scale power outages. Next winter the risk of large blackouts is even greater. The culprit for the looming crisis is the single most important instrument of German energy policy: the “Renewable Energy Law.”

According to Die Welt, the “Renewable Energy Law” (EEG) stipulates the priority of green electricity supply. What was once useful as an aid for the market introduction of wind and solar power, has today, 12 years later, disastrous side effects.

It pushes those plants which alone can guarantee a stable power supply, i.e. gas and coal-fired power plants, out of the market far too early. More and more facilities are being decommissioned. The result is a significantly higher risk of large-scale power outages, so-called blackouts, whose duration and propagation is hard to predict.

Federal Network Agency (FNA) said the near-blackouts last winter are hard to overestimate: although the cold spell was short and mild, the situation in the German electricity network was “very serious” according to the Agency.

Of course that’s in Europe, it’s got nothing to do with Australia. Or has it?

Last week our Greens, those tree hugging, environmental loonies, have once again stepped outside their so-called area of expertise.

The Newcastle Herald and Lithgow Mercury both report that the Greens are introducing a bill before the House of Representatives, the No New Coal Power Bill 2012, which would halt the planning approval for the proposed Cobbora coal mine. Approvals for this coal mine, which is midway between regional townships Mudgee and Dubbo, would be scuttled under the Greens’ legislation.

Their reasons?

“The new power stations would flood the state with cheap electricity and undermine the viability of renewable energy and energy efficiency,”

That’s head-shaking stuff. ‘Cheap electricity??’

Spokesman for the Greens, Jon Kaye, goes on to say,

“Thousands of new jobs in the solar and wind sectors would be lost.”

These jobs are non-existent now, and if they eventuate, will be jobs reliant totally on government subsidies. Is this the future of our economy? A government funded society?

Wind and solar power are by no means a viable source of base load power, as the situation in Germany shows. As it currently stands, the power that runs our cities, our industries, can only be maintained by coal-fired or hydro power. Not only won’t the Greens approve new dams, they are now blocking new coal-fired power stations.

It’s obvious that the Greens are prepared to turn the power off before there are equally viable alternatives. And as a result, they are prepared to trash Australia’s economy in the name of their Green religion. This is their socialist manifesto. Hiding behind the environmental banner, they are prepared to return Australia to the 1930s.

Perhaps a further look at Germany may provide some perspective.

The before pictures in this pictorial look alarmingly like photos taken at the end of WW2. Unfortunately, they were taken some forty five years later in 1990, after the fall of the Berlin Wall.

This is what socialism looks like.

The after pictures were taken ten years later, after capitalism had a chance to clean up the mess that socialism made of East Germany.

The complete photo spread is here, and it’s shocking in its profundity.

Socialists, enjoy.

oh, and btw, an old DDR (East German) joke…..

What would happen if the desert became a Communist country? Nothing for a while. Then there’d be a sand shortage.

 

Advertisements

13 Comments

  1. evcricket says:

    This is so wrong I don’t know where to start.

    What is a near-blackout, given that in every electricity network in the world, supply always equals demand?
    Why are the Germans at risk of blackout, given that they are connected to a trans continental network? Was the whole of Europe at risk of blackout?

    One thing is good though; Iain still feels free and confident enough to post on topics he knows absolutely nothing about. Vive la free speech!

  2. Ray Dixon says:

    It’s GD’s post, not Iain’s, Ev.

    Putting your irrelevant socialism ‘before & after shots’ aside, GD (I don’t think we’re headed for an East Germany styled economy and I could show you some pretty run-down buildings in capitalist countries too – just travel out a bit beyond your suburban enclave), I do agree that we are moving too quickly to phase out coal-powered electricity and in the process making it too expensive. It’s killing the economy. That quote: “The new power stations would flood the state with cheap electricity and undermine the viability of renewable energy and energy efficiency,” says it all. Australia should have cheap electricity in order to stimulate growth and stimulate investment in viable renewables. Making existing electricity so expensive is the wrong way to bring about change.

  3. Iain Hall says:

    Evan
    even though Germany is connected to the European grid there is still no guarantee that there will be sufficient capacity in the system to meet the needs of a European winter all because Angela Merkal decided to take Germany’s nuclear capacity off line purely to meet the ideological requirements of the Green religion.
    Like GD I have always thought that its the wrong approach to make conventional energy more expensive so that the so called alternatives are relatively more competitive. Far better to wait until those alternatives are both efficient enough and economically viable.

  4. […] Germany Faces Energy Disaster and our Greens Follow Blindly (iainhall.wordpress.com) […]

  5. Damian says:

    Iain, what’s happening here? The Sandpit is starting to sound like A Western Heart.

  6. GD says:

    given that in every electricity network in the world, supply always equals demand

    Thanks Ev for offering that technical detail. You’re absolutely correct. However, there are other factors, such as supply voltage and supply frequency which do affect the ability of the grid to supply power to the populace. In such circumstances supply can be interrupted. There’s another technical detail for you.

    The German Bundesnetzagentur (Federal Network Agency) is the authority of the German federal government overseeing electricity, gas, telecommunications, post and railway networks. You know there’s a real problem when the agency itself issues a press release warning that the national power grid is in serious trouble and that something needs to be done urgently.

    Also as Iain points out, German president Merkel has decided to take Germany’s nuclear capacity off line purely to meet the ideological requirements of the Green religion. This will have ramifications on the supply of power to Germany. At some point the trans-continental grid will not support Germany with its new solar, wind technologies and its ageing coal-fired plants.

    Removing nuclear plants from the energy grid is sheer stupidity, and as I said in my post, The Greens are blindly following along.

    This is so wrong I don’t know where to start.

    Let me help you. Perhaps you can explain why we should reject cheap energy and instead litter the landscape with useless, environmentally unfriendly, and hazardous to health wind turbines?

    Can you explain how the Greens’ policies of blocking the building of new coal-fired power stations can possibly be of benefit to Australians?

    My example from Germany is merely a precursor of what will happen here.

  7. Iain Hall says:

    Damian
    There was a time when I had a fair bit of respect for AWH but that changed over time and I no longer feel the same about the site or the direction that it has taken. That said I am actaully quite welcoming of dissenting voices here, if they make a reasoned argument without invective, something that AWH never achieved. So how precisely is it that you think that this site is like that blog? An answer of more than 140 characters would be appreciated as here at the Sandpit we prefer a more expansive argument than the sort of snark that twitter fosters.

  8. Damian says:

    Iain pls. You have a guest blogger prattling on about greens and socialism based on an article published in a conservative German newspaper.

  9. Iain Hall says:

    Damian
    Apart from knocking GD’s source can you actaully refute his argument?
    I have read all of the Greens’ policy and there are plenty of elements there that would be right at home with any number of far left socialist positions so why do you think that it is unreasonable to suggest that the Greens are a socialist party?

  10. Craigy says:

    In their new book, Merchants of Doubt, historians Naomi Oreskes and Erik Conway explain how a loose–knit group of high-level scientists, with extensive political connections, ran effective campaigns to mislead the public and deny well-established scientific knowledge over four decades. In seven compelling chapters addressing tobacco, acid rain, the ozone hole, global warming, and DDT, Oreskes and Conway roll back the rug on this dark corner of the American scientific community, showing how the ideology of free market fundamentalism, aided by a too-compliant media, has skewed public understanding of some of the most pressing issues of our era.

    http://www.merchantsofdoubt.org/

  11. GD says:

    Thanks for the book review, Craigy. Was it yours? or a review off the back cover?
    Ah, it was a direct quote from the website. Of course it was. It is a bit much though, that on the website, the writers actually receive a recommendation from Al Gore.

    “Anyone concerned about the state of democracy in America should read this book.”— Former Vice President Al Gore, author of An Inconvenient Truth

    really?

    I too like to read, however I read not only fiction but also well researched books based upon reality.

    Here’s one:

    Agenda 21: An Expose of the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Initiative and the Forfeiture of American Sovereignty and Liberties

    or you could try:

    The Real Global Warming Disaster: Is the Obsession with ‘climate Change’ Turning Out to be the Most Costly Scientific Blunder in History?

    Montford’s expose of the so-called hockey stick proof is also a good read.

    The Hockey Stick Illusion

    There is so much good reading out there now that there is no excuse for still supporting the Al Gores’ of this world; the scaremongers who, while making millions from their naive and erroneous predictions, are also misleading governments and demeaning society with their misguided predictions of doom and gloom.

    I’d like to read your book of the month, but with a price tag of $27 and no chance of preview, I’ll pass. You can, though, read the first few chapters of any of the books I have mentioned for free.

    I guess propaganda costs more.

  12. evcricket says:

    GD,

    “Thanks Ev for offering that technical detail. You’re absolutely correct. However, there are other factors, such as supply voltage and supply frequency which do affect the ability of the grid to supply power to the populace. In such circumstances supply can be interrupted. There’s another technical detail for you.”

    Voltage in a grid does not change, only frequency does. Remember Y9 physics? “SAVPAC”. Series Add Voltage, Parallel Add Current. All the loads and generators in a network are paralleled out, hence all the same voltage. Frequency goes up and down depending on if current demands are being met.

    “Also as Iain points out, German president Merkel has decided to take Germany’s nuclear capacity off line purely to meet the ideological requirements of the Green religion. This will have ramifications on the supply of power to Germany. At some point the trans-continental grid will not support Germany with its new solar, wind technologies and its ageing coal-fired plants. ”

    Noting the above, this is a pretty significant claim GD. You are stating quite clearly here that Germany don’t know what they are doing and have disconnected too much capacity, thus meaning that under-frequency conditions were more prevalant last year. Obviously over-frequency occasions disprove your argument, as this would suggest Germany has too much capacity. So, once you checked the fault log to determine that despite the best minds in Europe’s advice and analysis, you’ve figured out that Germany hasn’t got enough generation connected to the network. Have you called them? Germany needs to know.

    Would you mind sending me a link to the German network fault log? I didn’t thnk that was public knowledge.

    “Removing nuclear plants from the energy grid is sheer stupidity, and as I said in my post, The Greens are blindly following along.”

    Maybe just send that to the Germans. Qualitative analysis is always best with electricity.

    “Let me help you. Perhaps you can explain why we should reject cheap energy and instead litter the landscape with useless, environmentally unfriendly, and hazardous to health wind turbines?

    Can you explain how the Greens’ policies of blocking the building of new coal-fired power stations can possibly be of benefit to Australians?

    My example from Germany is merely a precursor of what will happen here.”

    Leaving aside your ideaolgical nonsense about technology choices above, I can only dream that what has occurred in Germany will happen here. From Climate Spectator:
    [http://www.climatespectator.com.au/commentary/end-nuclear?utm_source=Climate%20Spectator&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=1f0f11b705-CSPEC_DAILY}

    “In fact we’ve heard these kind of nuclear dependency claims before and they’ve been wrong time and time again. The pro-nuclear evangelists claimed that Germany would be importing electricity from its neighbours last year, after switching off half of its nuclear reactor fleet.

    Instead of importing electricity, Germany exported 6TWh of electricity and what’s more, it reduced its carbon emissions by two per cent.”

    That whole article is worth reading, including the section which mentions that 3 nuclear plants worth of capacity are being soaked up in Japan stopping the mothballed plants from melting down. Do some more reading GD, the world’s moved on without you.

    Ev.

  13. alan says:

    HaHaHa, I fell off my chair laughing.
    I Google Christopher Booker and what gems there are to find there.
    A fruit cake in the mould of Bolt, maybe even worse(amazing to think that is even possible)

    …….Asbestos is is not a problem
    …….Passive smoking is not a problem.
    ……etc, etc

    The other two guys, I can’t be bothered checking, but my guess is it’s more of the same.
    I commend you GD on your choice of reading matter.
    I prefer non fiction though.

    And to think I thought that you were deadly serious when reading your post above .
    hahahahaha, thanks for the comedy session
    You’re better than Benny Hill

Comments are closed.

Welcome to the Sandpit

I love a good argument so please leave a comment

Please support the Sandpit

Please support the Sandpit

Do you feel lucky?

Do you feel lucky?

%d bloggers like this: