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Memo Clive Palmer: We Don’t Want You In Victoria

Iain Hall:

palmergiphy

Palmer is a clown, not your happy go-lucky circus clown though, more like the sort of evil clown envisioned by Stephen King in his novel “It” he is also as you suggest like a spoilt brat who throws tantrums when he does not get what he wants . Sadly for this country I think that he is like a bigger fatter and far more ugly version of Pauline Hansen and he is going for precisely the same disaffected voting demographic the truly tragic thing is that he has the cash to make more headway than One Nation ever could have done. The only thing that could truly stop palmer is his very obvious obesity and the high possibility that he will not live to a ripe old age. We can be sure that if Palmer himself carks it the “party” he created will likewise quickly evaporate.
None the less there is always the possibility that those elected to the senate on his ticket may not be as compliant once they actually take up their seats. I saw Jackie Lambie on Q& A the other week and she struck me as the sort of woman who will not meekly vote as Clive says she is no Ex footballer who will have more loyalty than good sense and it only takes one of his upper house crew to break-ranks and the Palmer chimera will disintegrate no matter how much money he throws into the game.
That all said there is still a possibility that Shorten may man up and stop blocking the government’s repeal of both the mining and carbon taxes which would be smart politics from Labor. By finally capitulating and letting the bills pass they will show that they respect the mandate of the last election and they can argue that they did not just roll over like a dog. Further they can take the focus off the stupidity of both the Greens and Palmer and remind the people that it is they, and not the silly and extremist minor parties who are the potential alternative government. Frankly Labor needs to have more skin in the game of politics and they should be doing everything they can to make the minors irrelevant.
Ok well that’s what I think and maybe I’m dead wrong or only partially right but one thing that I know is that Tony Abbott will not be led like a sheep by Clive’s antics. He has amply demonstrated that he is a far better player at the game of politics and I think that we will find that once the new senate sits that Palmer will not be the king-maker as he imagines himself to be, instead he will earn nothing but derision and well deserved scorn.
Cheers Comrade Yale

giphy

Originally posted on The Red And The Blue:

THINGS ARE BAD ENOUGH with the Communists Greens and the plethora of independents and single-interest parties chasing public election funds already on the loose without rewarding Clive Palmer’s obsequious, outrage-based tactics with seats in Parliament. Palmer and his party promise no more than simply to be elected, if their cynical rhetoric fools enough people. With a state election due in Victoria, they are not welcome in my home state.

One reality of politics that never ceases to amaze me is the fact that the people who most loudly profess disgust with the political process — and with the Liberal and Labor parties in particular — are also mostly those who couldn’t be bothered joining a political party in an attempt to have some input into the process, let alone bother to avail themselves of the finer details of issues or to look beyond the spin (that Labor especially peddles) in which their outrage comes ready-packaged (which is…

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The IPCC now says it’s OK to adapt to ‘climate change’

Find below an excellent piece by Don Aitkin about the shift in the IPCC focus from mitigation to adaptation, which is something that I have been rabbiting on about for many years both here and elsewhere. I republish it here under the  terms of its creative commons licence. Further this post is dedicated to PKD  who still has not produced that long promised essay on Climate change.

When I first became interested in global warming ten years ago what puzzled me at once was the insistence on ‘mitigation’ — reducing or abolishing carbon dioxide emissions — and the  almost complete indifference to ‘adaptation’ — preparing in advance to deal with droughts, floods, high temperatures, and all the rest of the climate possibilities. We seemed to  be doing something in that direction, but hardly enough.

Professor Bob Carter, one scientist that has been sceptical from the beginning of the global warming scare, suggested long ago that Australia adopt  and adapt the New Zealand civil defence management system, which is built around the ’4 Rs’ — Reduction, Readiness, Response, Recovery. As any Australian of mature years knows, we are prone to natural ‘disasters’, and our SES system is one form of our own preparedness.

But the IPCC has never been interested. For it the key thing has been to get carbon emissions down before disaster overwhelms us. As I have argued many times, this strategy has three weaknesses: it is practically unfeasible to do it quickly, it cannot be done on a global scale, and the outcome of whatever any country does will have no discernible effect on temperature there. Given ‘the pause’, now approaching 18 years on one measure, one could also argue that there is no immediate need to do anything at all in the mitigation department. Isn’t it time, for example, that we built some more ‘flood-proofing’ dams?

Well, the IPCC has now given what seems to be a cautious go-ahead to adaptation. According to Chris Field , one of the co-chairs of the new report,

The really big breakthrough in this report is the new idea of thinking about managing climate change… Climate-change adaptation is not an exotic agenda that has never been tried. Governments, firms, and communities around the world are building experience with adaptation. This experience forms a starting point for bolder, more ambitious adaptations that will be important as climate and society continue to change.

Dr Field also declaredThe natural human tendency is to want things to be clear and simple. And one of the messages that doesn’t just come from the IPCC, it comes from history, is that the future doesn’t ever turn out the way you think it will be… being prepared for a wide range of possible futures is just always smart.

Does this mean that the IPCC is giving up on ‘mitigation’. No. But, at least it seems to me that, the IPCC may well be coming to the view that if it is to survive, it will have to have more than the mitigation arrow in its quiver. If I am right, then we can expect more IPCC papers on how best to adapt. Judith Curry devoted her 30 March blog to this subject, which drew 787 comments at last count. She cited an article by Andrew Lilico she had read in the Telegraph (London), which put forward the following:

… the global GDP costs of an expected global average temperature increase of 2.5 degrees Celsius over the 21st century will be between 0.2 and 2 per cent. To place that in context, the well-known Stern Review of 2006 estimated the costs as 5-20 per cent of GDP. Stern estimates the costs of his recommended policies for mitigating climate change at 2 per cent of GDP – and his estimates are widely regarded as relatively optimistic (others estimate mitigation costs as high as 10 per cent of global GDP). At a 2.4 per cent annual GDP growth rate, the global economy increases 0.2 per cent every month.

So the mitigation deal has become this: Accept enormous inconvenience, placing authoritarian control into the hands of global agencies, at huge costs that in some cases exceed 17 times the benefits even on the Government’s own evaluation criteria, with a global cost of 2 per cent of GDP at the low end and the risk that the cost will be vastly greater, and do all of this for an entire century, and then maybe – just maybe – we might save between one and ten months of global GDP growth.

Whereas previously the IPCC emphasised the effects climate change could have if not prevented, now the focus has moved on to how to make economies and societies resilient and to adapt to warming now considered inevitable. Climate exceptionalism – the notion that climate change is a challenge of a different order from, say, recessions or social inclusion or female education or many other important global policy goals – is to be down played. Instead, the new report emphasised that adapting to climate change is one of many challenges that policymakers will face but should have its proper place alongside other policies.

Our first step in adapting to climate change should be to accept that we aren’t going to mitigate it. We’re going to have to adapt. That doesn’t mean there might not be the odd mitigation-type policy, around the edges, that is cheap and feasible and worthwhile. But it does mean that the grandiloquent schemes for preventing climate change should go. Their day is done. Even the IPCC – albeit implicitly – sees that now.

It’s all too soon to say where this is going. But it would seem to me that the Abbott Government could pick up the drift and win a brownie point or two by talking sagely about ‘adaptation’ — and quote the IPCC in so doing.

I’m damning Labor with faint praise

 ''Tony Abbott did not put Labor in opposition, the Australian people put us here, and unless we change, it is where we will stay,'' Mr Shorten planned to say. He conceded that, for too long, Labor had seen its problems as about image, message and its ability to sell its policies. ''It's more serious than this. We need to change ourselves. We need to change our party,'' he wrote. click for source


”Tony Abbott did not put Labor in opposition, the Australian people put us here, and unless we change, it is where we will stay,” Mr Shorten planned to say.
He conceded that, for too long, Labor had seen its problems as about image, message and its ability to sell its policies.
”It’s more serious than this. We need to change ourselves. We need to change our party,” he wrote.
click for source

Well now the mother of all by-elections is all over bar the shouting (and counting, assuming that its not stuffed up again) its good to see the leader of the opposition moving to reform the ALP to better reflect the diminished standing of the union movement in Australian society. The requirement that someone who wants to join the Labor party has to also be a financial member of a union is an anachronism that has surely been putting off a lot of people who might otherwise join the party. Now as much as I dislike the ALP as it is currently constituted and the polices that it pursues I do recognise the need for there to be a viable yin to the LNP’s yang and as the Greens are too loopy to be let anywhere near the levers of government a viable ALP is the best option and for them to be viable they need to be more reflective of the people that they purport to represent.  So after Ray has picked himself up  after discovering me writing something positive about Electricity Bill Shorten I’m sure that we will be in agreement that making  Labor party membership easier and cheaper will be a good for the political landscape of this country.

Cheers Comrades

evil-latte

Equivalent to getting checkmate with the horsey

In my youth I utterly and completely despised the imperial honours and the way that every tired political hack would get a knighthood for “services to the parliament”  every little tin pot party toady could become “Sir Arsewipe” worse still was the sycophantic way that so many people treated these self styled aristocrats. My boss at  the  little supermarket where I had my first job was one such and  he was so deferential to the local “Sir and lady Fishface” (name changed to protect the guilty ) that I just wanted to vomit. It was the worst possible example of the perniciousness of the English class system writ large. So it will probably surprise many people when I say that I am most impressed by Tony Abbott taking the whole country by surprise and reinstating Knights and Dames to the Order of Australia honours. Its a brilliant piece of political theatre.

As its , what? thirty odd years since Bob Hawke gave such honours the chop so most of the last cohort so honoured have died or have appointments with the undertaker and there has been enough of an interregnum that new appointees will be viewed on their own terms rather than as part of the old tradition the timing is spot on. As for just who can qualify its  an excellent an clever bit of policy design to restrict the number of honours to no more than four per year and that to qualify requires exemplary  service to the community and more importantly that service can not be as any sort of elected official.

In Political terms of course the usual suspects will go utterly troppo, there are already inklings of this around the traps and while the minions of the left invoke their republican credentials there will be no need for the government to expend a great deal of energy defending this change to the way that we honour our most dedicated servants of the people, after all to receive such an honour a person has to have consistently gone above and beyond for their country.

Its the sort of move that, on the chess board, would be equivalent to  getting checkmate with the horsey…

Your move Comrades

a Knight

Some thoughts about mooted changes to Media ownership law in Australia

 

iamnotanartist_gifparanoia_16

People are creatures of habit and it is only that so many people are habituated to buying the news papers that any are still being sold at all. Just take any kind of commute on public transport and consider how many people are reading a paper and how many are staring at a screen instead. Some certainly may be playing games or even watching video but I expect that they will be out numbering those who are still reading dead tree editions of the MSM.

Then there is the things in the paper that people buy them for, most papers are not exclusively about politics and current affairs anyway, so some readers will be buying the paper for its coverage of sport, lifestyle or even just for the crossword puzzles.  My point is that the political classes (in particular those from the left ) just look at the raw sales figured and they think that every reader of the Herald Sun is in the thrall of Rupert Murdoch and that the owners dictate to their readers directing their opinions. The reality is that all media entities write to their audience. If they don’t their audience wither away quite quickly.  With the coming of the internet this is even more how things work Online entities are even more in an endless quest for readers so you have to play to what your readers want rather than thinking that you can manipulate their thinking. I have been writing a blog for nearly a decade now and I have noticed just how quickly particular readers flit in and out its the same now with the way that people read things online from the likes of Murdoch, Fairfax or even the Guardian People don’t just get their news from one source any more no matter what the subject is they will read what several sources say about it and then make up their mind. This behaviour is the same when it comes to broadcast TV people flit form one channel to another seeking different perspectives. My argument is simple, if the media  consumers have changed their habits then perhaps there is something in the notion that media diversity laws from the last century should perhaps reflect those changes as well.

Cheers Comrades

breaking_news_animated

March in March, oh dear! or watching the lefty freakshow

In my younger days I  participated in various protests. It was political street theater then and its  the same thing now. The difference is that then it had a point then and now well its for such a grab bag of pointless posturing that all achieves is a jump in sales for inner city Latte purveyors.  One thing is clear though and that it proves what a disconnected bunch of posturing wankers our friends from the left have become. Courtesy of my twitter feed here  are a couple of the more amusing images :

as someone who is, well, challenged by orthographic perfection I find this very funny

As someone who is, well, challenged by orthographic perfection I find this very funny

Orthographic  revision needed here  too

Orthographic revision needed here too

Don't these volunteers realize that thereis nothing unusual about our recent bush fires?  that said young hottie in the foreground could start few fires all on her own

Don’t these volunteers realize that there is nothing unusual about our recent bush fires?
That said young hottie in the foreground could start few fires all on her own

I just love examples of lefty projection when its so telling.

I just love examples of lefty projection when its so telling.

Just look at all of that expensive clobber and note the Take away latte being carried by the woman on the left.

Just look at all of that expensive clobber and note the Take away latte being carried by the woman on the left.

Its all of the usual suspects, making the usual complaints in the very tedious old fashioned manner None of it will be remembered beyond Tuesday (that attractive volunteer may be remembered till Thursday! ;) ) and nothing will change in the polity as a result of this piece of nonsense.

Rollin on Comrades

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The naive minions of the left and aberrant sexuality

There is nothing that I love more than discovering that our friends from the left have been caught with their hands down the trousers of children, hang on let me clarify that, I detest the abuse in fact there is nothing more abhorrent to me but I certainly do love it when the naive maleficence of the left is revealed. I had great joy in the discovery of the way that the prototype of the Australian Greens endorsed paedophilia     and a very spirited  debate in the comment thread. Any how it seems that another element of the left has been caught out flirting with nonces, this time its elements of the left wing of the British Labor party:

Harriet Harman and Jack Dromey in 1982 Photograph: Pa

Harriet Harman and Jack Dromey in 1982 Photograph: Pa

But how did the Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE), whose affiliation to the NCCL has been exhaustively investigated by the Daily Mail, come to get a ticket to the party?

“It was an extraordinarily liberal period,” said Harry Fletcher, a criminal justice expert who at the time was the senior social worker for the National Council for One Parent Families. “The abortion laws had come in and capital punishment had been abolished.” People were pushing at every boundary – sexual, moral, legal. Fletcher recalled how the groups would spend hours debating whether the NCCL, which became the campaign group Liberty, should defend the right of someone with racist or homophobic views to express themselves. The discussion about defending the National Front’s right to march went on for months.

But by far the most divisive topic centred on the lowering of the age of consent. Many on the left thought that criminalising sexual behaviour between consenting teenagers was misguided and wanted it lowered to 14, a proposal endorsed by the NCCL’s executive committee. Others, like Fletcher, felt such a move would give a licence to older men to prey on young girls. Into this permissive climate crept the PIE, a group that actively promoted sex between children and adults and that was allowed not only to affiliate to the NCCL (in return for paying a £15 subscription) but enjoyed considerable recognition and support for its right to speak out on such issues.

The group inveigled itself so successfully into the NCCL that, as reported in the May 1978 edition of its magazine MagPIE, the council’s annual meeting passed a motion in support of PIE’s rights. Motion 39 stated: “This AGM reaffirms the right of free discussion and freedom to hold meetings for all organisations and individuals doing so within the law. Accordingly, whilst reaffirming the NCCL policy on the age of consent and the rights of children; particularly the need to protect those of prepubertal age, this AGM condemns the physical and other attacks on those who have discussed or attempted to discuss paedophilia, and reaffirms the NCCL’s condemnation of harassment and unlawful attacks on such persons.”

That motion was passed two years after Harman has claimed that the group no longer wielded influence in the NCCL. “They had been pushed to the margins before I actually went to NCCL and to allege that I was involved in collusion with paedophilia or apologising for paedophilia is quite wrong and is a smear,” she told the BBC last week. She said her husband had successfully fought to stop PIE having any influence in the NCCL in 1976 – two years before she joined as its legal officer.

Admittedly, any group could join the NCCL, which had more than 1,000 affiliate member organisations and the council’s motion probably owed more to defending the principle of free speech than defending PIE. And it would be wrong to portray PIE as a major force. Being small, comprising only a handful of activists and with a membership estimated to be between 300 and 1,000, PIE was not a powerful voice at a time when the main debates within the council were about sexual equality and race relations. But its views were so profoundly abhorrent to most of Britain that it is still hard to see why the council did not do more to disown PIE from the start.

click for source

What I find most darkly amusing about the report from the Guardian that I quote from is the headline “How paedophiles infiltrated the left and hijacked the fight for civil rights” there was clearly nothing covert at all about the creeps from PIE joining the NCCL they were entirely open about their beliefs and their desire to make their perversion more socially acceptable. there was therefore no infiltration, they asked to join and they were welcomed. That is what makes these minions of the left so culpable now.  Eventually PIE  were shunned by the NCCL but the shame of the left was that they were ever  allowed to have the supposed respectability of membership in the first place.

Am I the only one who sees a pattern here? The prototype of the Greens endorses paedophilia, the British Labor party is complicit in endorsing PIE so it seems to me  be in the DNA of the left to accept any expression  of abnormal sexuality . Can it be that the far left (and maybe those further from the extreme as well) might just have some equally vile skeletons in their collective closets?  OK that is enough Schardenfreude for this morning I realise taht the Australian left are of course just that little bit better than its European precursors but then again they don’t have much to say about followers of Islam who take the life of the Prophet as their template to “marry” pre-pubescent girls do they? Hmm maybe they are not that much better after all…

Cheers Comrades

swing

“The next move, on Monday morning, was to the orange lifeboat.”

The brilliance of the government’s tactics in using those orange boats is being  refined with each time that they have to be deployed:

Some of the 28 asylum seekers returned to Indonesia on an Australian lifeboat. Photo: Michael Bachelard

Some of the 28 asylum seekers returned to Indonesia on an Australian lifeboat. Photo: Michael Bachelard

The asylum seekers were transferred to the Customs vessel – perhaps MV Triton, though they do not know the name. As they were loaded on board, officers were ”pushing one by one with hands behind our back”, Ali says, showing on his friend how their arms were bent into a painful position.

Any objections or requests for food and water were shouted down, no discussion entered into.

”He says: ‘Don’t speak. Shut up. F— you’,” Ali says, the others nodding. One man, Khazim Mohammad, from Iraq, was lying sick on the boat: ”The [Australian officer] said, ‘You’re joking. Liar, liar’ … and grabbed him and pulled him.”

The Indonesian crew have told Central Java police that the wooden boat was then ”blown up”. They cannot say how this happened, but speculate on a bomb.

On board the large Customs ship, interaction between crew and asylum seekers was minimal. Once their details were taken and entered on a computer, the men were given wristbands with numbers on them.

For about three days, they say they were kept below decks.

”Inside the big ship, no sun, no air. We don’t know if it’s night or day. We can’t sleep; loud noises,” says Ali.

They were fed once – cheese sandwiches – and given a cup and told to fill it up in the bathroom to drink. ”For two days we went on hunger strike.”

The Indonesian crew was kept in a separate part of the ship.

On the Customs patrol boat, Ashrof says someone searched their belongings, and all valuables – money, phone, SIM card – were taken. He does not know who took them. No phones means that, unlike on other ships, there is no video footage of their experience.

The next move, on Monday morning, was to the orange lifeboat. It was the first time they had seen it and the transfer was done in sight of land.

”The soldiers brought [us to] the orange boat … and closed the door and said to the driver of this boat … ‘Go to that island’,” Ali says.

Again the Australians would not answer questions. The Indonesians – who spoke almost no English – said it was Christmas Island. Ali did not believe them.

But there was no chance of turning back to the real Christmas Island. The crew, though experienced sailors, had never seen anything like the orange blob they now captained, and there was not enough fuel to go anywhere except to that island on the horizon.

The island, it turned out, was Java.

The lifeboats are small and inside they feel smaller. They are dark and airless with only a couple of small, high windows. Having 28 on board would have felt crowded – not everyone could have a seat, though the nameplate says it is rated for 55 people.

”No air inside and no airconditioning for the orange boat. We are very sick. We have no oxygen. We are very sick,” says Ali. ”It’s like animals. Animals [cannot be treated] like this.”

There was water on board and muesli bars.

The journey lasted only about three hours before the boat ran aground in huge seas on a rugged bay near the village of Kebumen. They were 30 metres from the beach and the surf was high, but there was little choice but to jump.

”We jumped from the boat. We are at the beach, ocean high. We arrive and drift, arrive and drift. We think we will die. We think we will die. We can’t swim,” Ali says.

Finally on the beach the exhausted men were confronted with a steep, slippery slope to climb before a local farmer found them and called the police.

The crew is now in custody being questioned by police under people smuggling laws for taking people out of the country illegally and then, at the insistence of the Australian Customs and Border Protection, back into it. The asylum seekers are bound for detention, although they don’t know where.

Sarrah Hansen-Young a very vocal useful idiot  gives us a selfie taken at the Gay `Mardi Gras

Sarrah Hansen-Young a very vocal useful idiot gives us a selfie taken at the Gay `Mardi Gras

Some how I doubt that this group of chancers will be trying again and while I expect that the usual suspects  will whine about the less that luxurious  conditions in the orange boats , or the confiscation  of mobile phones  from this cohort  but there is no escaping the simple fact that this tactic works as a way to return people who try to enter this country illegally under the pretense that they are refugees . Labor believed all of  the lies that they were told because   they wanted the preferences of Greens voters  and the Greens were the most useful idiots to the people smuggling trade but we , the Australian people, want  orderly a controlled  immigration program that chooses socially useful immigrants that will help make this country a better place  instead of self selectors who bring with them a legacy of self serving deceit.

Cheers Comrades

Who needs bullets?

Who needs bullets?

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