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Play Chess online

check out the source of these clever cartoons by clicking the image

check out the source of these clever cartoons by clicking the image

My Car Blog

Just personal and not that political

Just personal and not that political

Sweet as, in Sydney

likes a drink

the name says it all

Cafes life and food

Life in London

Living and love

Amusing and witty Canadian

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Gender Issues

Gender Issues

No to feminist oppression

Good sense on Domestic violence issues

No Misandry here

Enviomental sites

Environment and global warming

String theory and debunking AGW from a physicist's point of view

Jo does it for me

Anthony debunks "Global Warming" with wit and style

AGW Scepticism NZ style

Steve knows his sums

Jennifer rocks!

definitely not futile

mainly the other side

mainly the other side

Decaffeinated Soy Latte Sipper

libertarian central

Legal Eagle and Scepticlawyer

A Good Leftie

The good lefty

knowledgeable on Islam

Conservatives

Conservatives

a wise head on young shoulders

he rides true

Bing Bing

kae

Feisty Carrot top blogger

Godd stuff !!!

Good stuff here!!!

Mild Colonial Boy

more than legal tender

Hated by leftards because he cuts them to shreds

Good sense on mid-east questions

from her bunker in Londonstan

Witty, amusing and hated by leftards

Has the right attitude to cyclists

Mark Richardson

Absolutely Retro Minimalist Simplification revisited

Cheers Comrades

 

 

The IPCC now says it’s OK to adapt to ‘climate change’

Find below an excellent piece by Don Aitkin about the shift in the IPCC focus from mitigation to adaptation, which is something that I have been rabbiting on about for many years both here and elsewhere. I republish it here under the  terms of its creative commons licence. Further this post is dedicated to PKD  who still has not produced that long promised essay on Climate change.

When I first became interested in global warming ten years ago what puzzled me at once was the insistence on ‘mitigation’ — reducing or abolishing carbon dioxide emissions — and the  almost complete indifference to ‘adaptation’ — preparing in advance to deal with droughts, floods, high temperatures, and all the rest of the climate possibilities. We seemed to  be doing something in that direction, but hardly enough.

Professor Bob Carter, one scientist that has been sceptical from the beginning of the global warming scare, suggested long ago that Australia adopt  and adapt the New Zealand civil defence management system, which is built around the ’4 Rs’ — Reduction, Readiness, Response, Recovery. As any Australian of mature years knows, we are prone to natural ‘disasters’, and our SES system is one form of our own preparedness.

But the IPCC has never been interested. For it the key thing has been to get carbon emissions down before disaster overwhelms us. As I have argued many times, this strategy has three weaknesses: it is practically unfeasible to do it quickly, it cannot be done on a global scale, and the outcome of whatever any country does will have no discernible effect on temperature there. Given ‘the pause’, now approaching 18 years on one measure, one could also argue that there is no immediate need to do anything at all in the mitigation department. Isn’t it time, for example, that we built some more ‘flood-proofing’ dams?

Well, the IPCC has now given what seems to be a cautious go-ahead to adaptation. According to Chris Field , one of the co-chairs of the new report,

The really big breakthrough in this report is the new idea of thinking about managing climate change… Climate-change adaptation is not an exotic agenda that has never been tried. Governments, firms, and communities around the world are building experience with adaptation. This experience forms a starting point for bolder, more ambitious adaptations that will be important as climate and society continue to change.

Dr Field also declaredThe natural human tendency is to want things to be clear and simple. And one of the messages that doesn’t just come from the IPCC, it comes from history, is that the future doesn’t ever turn out the way you think it will be… being prepared for a wide range of possible futures is just always smart.

Does this mean that the IPCC is giving up on ‘mitigation’. No. But, at least it seems to me that, the IPCC may well be coming to the view that if it is to survive, it will have to have more than the mitigation arrow in its quiver. If I am right, then we can expect more IPCC papers on how best to adapt. Judith Curry devoted her 30 March blog to this subject, which drew 787 comments at last count. She cited an article by Andrew Lilico she had read in the Telegraph (London), which put forward the following:

… the global GDP costs of an expected global average temperature increase of 2.5 degrees Celsius over the 21st century will be between 0.2 and 2 per cent. To place that in context, the well-known Stern Review of 2006 estimated the costs as 5-20 per cent of GDP. Stern estimates the costs of his recommended policies for mitigating climate change at 2 per cent of GDP – and his estimates are widely regarded as relatively optimistic (others estimate mitigation costs as high as 10 per cent of global GDP). At a 2.4 per cent annual GDP growth rate, the global economy increases 0.2 per cent every month.

So the mitigation deal has become this: Accept enormous inconvenience, placing authoritarian control into the hands of global agencies, at huge costs that in some cases exceed 17 times the benefits even on the Government’s own evaluation criteria, with a global cost of 2 per cent of GDP at the low end and the risk that the cost will be vastly greater, and do all of this for an entire century, and then maybe – just maybe – we might save between one and ten months of global GDP growth.

Whereas previously the IPCC emphasised the effects climate change could have if not prevented, now the focus has moved on to how to make economies and societies resilient and to adapt to warming now considered inevitable. Climate exceptionalism – the notion that climate change is a challenge of a different order from, say, recessions or social inclusion or female education or many other important global policy goals – is to be down played. Instead, the new report emphasised that adapting to climate change is one of many challenges that policymakers will face but should have its proper place alongside other policies.

Our first step in adapting to climate change should be to accept that we aren’t going to mitigate it. We’re going to have to adapt. That doesn’t mean there might not be the odd mitigation-type policy, around the edges, that is cheap and feasible and worthwhile. But it does mean that the grandiloquent schemes for preventing climate change should go. Their day is done. Even the IPCC – albeit implicitly – sees that now.

It’s all too soon to say where this is going. But it would seem to me that the Abbott Government could pick up the drift and win a brownie point or two by talking sagely about ‘adaptation’ — and quote the IPCC in so doing.

A cure for Islamophobia

I dedicate this posting to GD :)

 

Cheers Comrade

warningmuslimsnearby-vi

Should the Saints go home?

Click for source

Click for source

I wonder what Ray thinks about this?
cheers Comrades

afl ball

We all want faster Broadband but sadly the ALP stuffed up the delivery of the NBN, especially in the bush.

Click for source

Click for source

Isn’t it amusing that dyed in the wool Abbott government haters are so willfully blind to the ineptitude of the previous government when it comes to the management of their big ticket schemes like the NBN? Now that the grown ups are in charge its very clear that in every possible way the Labor party were up top their necks in Africa’s longest river. As long as they rely only upon the broad brushstrokes of policy design and a futile hope that the details will resolve themselves they will not deserve to hold the treasury benches at a federal level. Design matters, and a good design takes real thought and real understanding of the need that you are trying to meet. Now if only the ALP could truly assimilate that idea then they might be electable again.

Cheers Comrades

2698b3bb30bb4dcb343b8ed1d0ec08914d7c5f4d_m

I’m damning Labor with faint praise

 ''Tony Abbott did not put Labor in opposition, the Australian people put us here, and unless we change, it is where we will stay,'' Mr Shorten planned to say. He conceded that, for too long, Labor had seen its problems as about image, message and its ability to sell its policies. ''It's more serious than this. We need to change ourselves. We need to change our party,'' he wrote. click for source


”Tony Abbott did not put Labor in opposition, the Australian people put us here, and unless we change, it is where we will stay,” Mr Shorten planned to say.
He conceded that, for too long, Labor had seen its problems as about image, message and its ability to sell its policies.
”It’s more serious than this. We need to change ourselves. We need to change our party,” he wrote.
click for source

Well now the mother of all by-elections is all over bar the shouting (and counting, assuming that its not stuffed up again) its good to see the leader of the opposition moving to reform the ALP to better reflect the diminished standing of the union movement in Australian society. The requirement that someone who wants to join the Labor party has to also be a financial member of a union is an anachronism that has surely been putting off a lot of people who might otherwise join the party. Now as much as I dislike the ALP as it is currently constituted and the polices that it pursues I do recognise the need for there to be a viable yin to the LNP’s yang and as the Greens are too loopy to be let anywhere near the levers of government a viable ALP is the best option and for them to be viable they need to be more reflective of the people that they purport to represent.  So after Ray has picked himself up  after discovering me writing something positive about Electricity Bill Shorten I’m sure that we will be in agreement that making  Labor party membership easier and cheaper will be a good for the political landscape of this country.

Cheers Comrades

evil-latte

Absolutely Retro Minimalist Simplification

I'm using a set of these instead of fuel injection.

I’m using a set of these instead of fuel injection.

Off to my brother’s to pick up an engine so I expect to be out for the better part of the day (even missing “The Insiders” and “The Bolt Report” also calling in on brother number two to pick up a set of Honda side draft carburettors which should mean that I will then have all of the ingredients for my  Absolutely Retro Minimalist  simplification of my sports car. I have lined up a place to weld up my manifold which will be a cut and shut of the Honda and Nissan elements. a Morris distributor with an electronic ignition upgrade will eliminate the computer entirely I have a new low pressure fuel pump to match the carbs and I have even managed to find the much longed for speedo drive gear for my transmission which means that I will no longer have to rely on my Sat Nav for my speed measurement.

Oh yeah I almost forget the count is on in the WA uber By election and guess what, not much has changed !

Cheers Comrades

IMG_20110704_173119

 

 

The other tribe of indigenous Aussie culture.

I am by nature rather eclectic in my viewing habits when it comes to broadcast TV I actually even watch some shows on SBS  and among that channel’s offerings   I have enjoyed several of the productions from Paul Fenech,” Fat Pizza” and “Housos” are both quite clever pieces of over the top satire and once you hey past the rather amateur acting and production values both programs demonstrate a clear affection for the subculture that they satirise . the Advertising for the new program to be screened on Seven Mate  shows some promise of the satire being turned up to eleven.

 

Bogan Hunters ... Housos cast (L-R) Elle Dawe (Shazza), Paul Fenech (Franky), and Kev Taumata (far right) go in search of Australia's biggest bogans. Photo: Peter Stoop Read more: http://www.smh.com.au/entertainment/tv-and-radio/housos-stars-reveal-australias-biggest-bogans-id-probably-be-scared-20140401-35vpo.html#ixzz2xfMQ1aS9

Bogan Hunters … Housos cast (L-R) Elle Dawe (Shazza), Paul Fenech (Franky), and Kev Taumata (far right) go in search of Australia’s biggest bogans. Photo: Peter Stoop 

Tasmania is the bogan capital of Australia and if you’re seeking bogans in the ACT look no further than the nation’s parliament.

These are just some of the findings to come out of a “bogan odyssey” completed by self-proclaimed boganologist Paul Fenech.

If I was thinking about a holiday in Australia and I saw this, I’d probably be scared

With the other two members of his crack team, Shazza (Elle Dawe) and Kev the Kiwi (Kevin Taumata), who will be familiar from the controversial SBS series Housos, Fenech has visited every state for a new 7Mate series called Bogan Hunters.

“There are plenty of places in each state,” he says. “Start in the centre of a city and drive for about 35 minutes minimum into the suburbs and you will find a bogan area.

“Tasmania has the top-shelf, black-label bogans. There’s an element of boganicity there that is worthy of another 15 years of social study.”

And the epicentre of Tasmanian bogan culture is in a suburb of Launceston, according to Fenech.

“It’s a place called Ravenswood, which they told us not to go to because we’d get stabbed,” he says. “But we didn’t get stabbed and it was all nice.”

From the promo it looks as if this program will also be taking a very big bite at the many reality shows that populate the Mate (and other Freeview channels ) schedule. You know,  the shows like “Auction Hunters” “Toy Hunters”  , “Swamp people”, “Pawn Stars”, “American Pickers” ect ect ect. Now I personally know more than a few “Bogans ” many of whom are  great people who would give you the shirt of their backs if you were a mate in trouble, they may not always be the most self aware folk but they are at generally an alright group as long as you understand and respect  their culture and, more importantly, you don’t try to patronise them. Sadly, far too many of the Late sipping brethren have more affection for every other  migrant or religious ethnicity than they do for the other tribe of indigenous Aussie culture.

Cheers Comrades

dropbears

I am on twitter as theiainhall

Previously at Iain Hall…

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