Home » Australian Politics » The illusory promise of bacon

The illusory promise of bacon

Another day and another Labor promise collapses into the ever widening maw of economic reality:

click for source

click for source

Perhaps we need to add a very simple perception filter for anything that Labor promises when they are standing at the pork barrel, namely unless the bacon is being handed out immediately don’t buy any eggs to go with it because you will never taste its salty goodness if you wait for the promise to be realised…
That said I was expecting something like this and I predict that the “school kids bonus” will be the next to go, in fact as I predicted earlier the next budget will in fact cut many of the expenditure items that are on the coalition hit list quite simply because of the softening up that we have been seeing in the last few weeks of pre budget commitments. To be honest I would not be surprised to see even things like the the Green energy fund cut or severely curtailed along with the compensation paid to benefit recipients.

This is a government that knows it is dead, formed by a party that likewise appreciates its lack of  a viable future, lead by an ego maniac who is a perfect  example of ambition far exceeding ability and the nation will asset itself with her removal in September, but until then we will have to put up with the farcical spectacle of a Zombie government run by the decaying corpse of the once great Australian Labor Party. The only question is can we stand the stench of its decay in the mean time?

Cheers Comrades

  diet-coke-with-bacon-only-america

About these ads

21 Comments

  1. deknarf says:

    Oh! It’s just Labor using that tried and true Howard philosophy of ‘Core, and non core promises’! Phoney Tony and his gang will announce all the broken promises AFTER the September election! Surprise! Surprise! ;-))

    Can’t win really! Put something on the table = profligacy! Take somethine off = backflip! Nothing about a sensible reallocation of resources given the economic climate!

  2. Ray Dixon says:

    Let’s be realistic deknarf. As much we hate to see it, the Labor government has almost totally unravelled. The so-called ‘big benefits’ to be reaped from the mining & carbon taxes have not (and will not) eventaute. Gillard just makes promises without seeing them through, without a clue as to how they will ever be realised and, it seems, without caring how much damage she does. It’s embarrassing.

    As one who believes that the only really great reforms of the past 50 years have only ever been delivered by Labor (medicare, wage accord, economic reform, native title etc) it really shits me to see them reduced to these big, ill-conceived, empty, grandoise schemes that fall flat on their face. I suggest the NDIS will be just as useless in delivering what it promises – and look at the cost!

    Sorry to say it, but Gillard has stuffed the ALP and the best thing that can happen to them now is a huge defeat in September – leading to a total clean out of the current leadership. Thanks Julia for handing government to do-nothing Abbott … on a silver platter.

  3. damage says:

    Have you forgotten the GST?

  4. Iain Hall says:

    Damage
    The GST is just not relevant to this topic.

    Deknarf

    For anyone who has been a long time Labor voter the current situation must be gut wrenching and as Ray says its all down to Gillard’s incompetence in particular and Labor’s stupidity in general. If only they had promised less and delivered more they would not be electoral poison now and likely to remain toxic for a decade or more. Despite may personal support for the coalition I am under no illusions that an Abbot government will be perfect but it has to be better than the current mob

  5. damage says:

    sorry Iain
    I was adressing Ray who suggested that “the only really great reforms of the past 50 years have only ever been delivered by Labor ”
    And he has forgotten that the White Australia Policy (a reform delivered by the ALP) was removed by the Liberals.

  6. Iain Hall says:

    Well that makes sense then Damage, do you mind making it clear who you are responding to in future, it just makes it easier to follow.

  7. Ray Dixon says:

    The W.A.P was bipartisanly imposed – as was its removal. But okay, I’ll give the Libs *some* of the credit for that. But none for imposing the GST. Hardly a “reform”.

  8. Iain Hall says:

    As I predicted:

    Mr Combet indicated there could be further cuts to the carbon compensation package to come in next Tuesday’s budget.

    “The original package was broadly budget neutral with the revised forecasts to be announced in the budget,” Mr Combet said.

    “There will be offsetting savings from a number of areas with the specific details to be announced in the budget. There will be savings that will be made. This is one of them that I am making clear today. But the specific details of all of that will be announced in the budget.”

    Source

  9. damage says:

    Hardly a reform? Really? I would have thought that changing the whole system of federal government funding of the states and getting rid of an incomprehensible sales tax system was a reform. The ALP had a chance to do it and even had a leader willing to champion it, but turned their back on it. The libs themself had shelved the idea until Howard brought it to the people and made the thing happen. I’m interested that you don’t think it reform.

  10. Ray Dixon says:

    The GST was a regressive tax. It hit the low income earmers the hardest and benefitted high income earners the most – who got huge tax relief as a result. It was a redistribution of wealth favouring the top end. I don’t care what YOU think, I have a different opinion. And I don’t regard it as a worthwhile reform. End of argument. You can keep arguing with yourself … as you seem to like to.

  11. damage says:

    So you agree that its a reform, just that your opinion is that it isn’t worthwhile.
    Interesting.

  12. Ray Dixon says:

    Certainly not “worthwhile”. What I said was this: “the only really great reforms of the past 50 years have only ever been delivered by Labor”. And quite clearly, I don’t regard the GST as being “a great reform”. You’ve got nowhere to go here … but down. As usual.

  13. damage says:

    So whell go through the great reforms shall we?

  14. damage says:

    Were you telling me the other day that one of the major reasons for the current ALP’s predicament is the high dollar. Since it was floated by the ALP and has caused such a problem the you wouldn’t defend it as a reform would you?

  15. damage says:

    How about selling QANTAS and the CBA? Completely dismanteling the tariff system? HECS? And the mining tax? That’s a joke right?

  16. Ray Dixon says:

    The dollar goes up and down, as it should. It doesn’t diminish Keating’s economic reforms, which are responsible for the 20+ years of economic growth we’ve had since the early 90s. Both parties have sold public assets and I don’t regard those as “reforms” by either party. Yes, Labor has stuffed up with some of its programs (especially lately) but so have the Libs (Workchoices anyone?). But I stand by my opinion that the great reforms of the past 50 years were made by Labor. We’re about done here. You can keeping talking to yourself but … good night.

  17. Iain Hall says:

    Ray there is one achievement that Labor has never succeeded in and that is paying down debt, in fact I don’t think that Labor have ever even managed to run a budget surplus even for just one year.

  18. Ray Dixon says:

    That’s not so surprising, Iain, when you understand that the Libs only create surpluses by (a) increasing taxes (b) selling infrastructure & assets (c) not providing any new services or infrastructure. It’s easy to have a surplus if you overcharge and don’t spend. Then Labor gets in and has to be the one to spend the money that the coalition won’t. Overall it balances up.

    And what’s the obsession with having a budget surplus anyway? No other country in the world thinks it’s as important as the coalition does. Governments are not private for profit corporations and are more like not-for-profit organisations. There’s nothing wrong with the current level of our debt and a lot of it has been necessary. Even the coalition would have struggled to bring in a surplus post the GFC and in the current economic climate.

  19. damage says:

    (b) selling infrastructure & assets
    Like QANTAS and the CBA?

    “And what’s the obsession with having a budget surplus anyway? No other country in the world thinks it’s as important as the coalition does. ”
    Mmmm we had 11 years of surpluss and survived the GFC and practically “No other country in the world ………..” has.
    That’s got to have something to do with the obsession.

    “Governments are not private for profit corporations and are more like not-for-profit organisations.”
    Pretty fair point – if you deliver balanced budgets. But the ALP as Iain pointed out – don’t.
    So debt increases each year, and like going to the races with $100 that you borrowed from the christmas piggy bank and coming home with $90 every week, eventually, there will be no prezies for the kids. I.e The GFC frigs your economy.

    “There’s nothing wrong with the current level of our debt and a lot of it has been necessary.”
    Agreed, but imagine if the 11 previous years had had defecits rather than surplusses?

    “Even the coalition would have struggled to bring in a surplus post the GFC and in the current economic climate.”
    Again that’s true, but now we are one of the best placed economies in the world – according to the ALP – and we should be able to see one.
    The problem for them is that they forcast one and now won’t deliver it and the reasons are all internal.
    Anyone would have to conceed that the GFC made it hard, but that is over now and its errors like mining tax sortfalls and carbon tax that are the causes of the financial woes of this government. They just can’t do the money stuff Ray. Never have had it right.

  20. Ray Dixon says:

    Financial woes? You talk like we’re Greece or Spain. Or even the USA. We’re not in any “woe”, financially speaking, it’s just that Gillard has stuffed up her schemes by putting a tax on mines and on carbon that won’t deliver her promised benefits. Now she wants to increase the medicare levy by a third to “partially” cover the NDIS scheme without making it clear where the rest of the money will come from and what exactly it’s going to be spent on. Same goes for the Gonski reforms – how will it be funded and is it really needed? All those ideas are just ‘feel-good’ political moves designed to attract votes without being thought through. No, the problem with the Labor govt is NOT its management of the economy per se, it’s with its inane leadership that keeps tinkering with the tax scheme without delivering any real benefits.

  21. damage says:

    “We”?? I was talking of the “financial woes of this government ” Ray. And they will lose office based on them.
    “Gillard has stuffed up her schemes by putting a tax on mines and on carbon that won’t deliver her promised benefits.” That’s somehow NOT a woe?

    “Now she wants to increase the medicare levy by a third to “partially” cover the NDIS scheme without making it clear where the rest of the money will come from and what exactly it’s going to be spent on.” Also not a woe? Ditto Gonski

    Tax schemea without delivering any real benefits? Those are financial achievements i suppose?

Comments are closed.

Welcome to the Sandpit

I love a good argument so please leave a comment

Please support the Sandpit

Please support the Sandpit

Do you feel lucky?

Do you feel lucky?

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 263 other followers

%d bloggers like this: