Home » God bothering » “Mass rape, amputations and killings – why families are fleeing terror in Mali”

“Mass rape, amputations and killings – why families are fleeing terror in Mali”

There are several commentators here who are very keen to defend the honour of Islam when ever pieces are published here at the Sandpit that are critical of that faith. Well I would be very interested to see what they might say about the exploits Islam in north Africa:

Mass rape, amputations and killings – why families are fleeing terror in Mali

At refugee camps, reports are flooding in of horrific human rights abuses in a country once famous for its music and joyous lifestyle. Mark Townsend reports on the jihadist nightmare in the Sahel

Zicki Fli and family outside their tent

Zicki Fli and family outside their tent in Goudebo camp, Burkina Faso. Photograph: Mark Townsend for The Observer

They were told to assemble in Gao’s market place at dusk. A man accused of using tobacco was escorted before the crowd by several members of the al-Qaida splinter group Movement for Tawhid and Jihad in West Africa.

“Then they chopped off his hand. They wanted to show us what they could do,” said Ahmed, 39, a meat trader from the town in northern Mali.

That was not the end of it. The severed hand was tossed into a vat of boiling water. Then, according to Ahmed, the man was pinned down and over the next hour the bent, misshapen hand was sewn crudely back onto his stump. Ahmed, too terrified to disclose his full name, fled Gao the next day, 8 November: “I had to go. I could not live my life.”

Fresh witness accounts such as this, from people arriving smothered in the red Sahel dust that clogs every pore at the refugee camps straddling the border with Burkina Faso, suggest that the situation in northern Mali is deteriorating fast. Given the dangerous situation in the region, it was impossible to verify the accounts, but they were numerous and disturbing.

Mali graphic Credit: Observer graphics

Islamist militants who seized control of an area larger than the UK six months ago have imposed their ultra-conservative brand of sharia law. The tales recounted suggest a population subjugated by a regime well versed in appalling brutality. Allegations of war crimes include summary executions, mass rape, racism and the targeting of elders by child soldiers recruited by the extremists. Some allege that child soldiers are being forced to rape women.

Source

Its not a pretty picture, but it is one that is entirely due to the pernicious ideology that is Islam and I am at a total loss as to how any reasonable person can think otherwise.

With a very long and sad sigh Comrades

warningmuslimsnearby-vi

 

 

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17 Comments

  1. Brian says:

    My view of Africa is that it is a place where societies are still infected with sexism, superstition, brutality and rule by tribal strong men. Islam did not cause those things but it does provide an ideological reason for them to survive. I suspect if these thugs weren’t Muslims, they’d be doing all this anyway.

    Also, look at the role Catholicism played in fueling the genocide in Rwanda. Religion just reinforces tribal thuggery, it doesn’t create it.

  2. Iain Hall says:

    Sure thing Brian but the level totalitarian brutality done in the name of Islam is orders of magnitude worse than that done in the name of Jesus.

  3. Brian says:

    Not historically Iain. When you tot up the wars, colonialism, anti-Semitism, aparthid, oppression and child abuse carried out under Christian banners since the 4th century, I think it’s fairly clear who is leading the totalitarian brutality stakes.

    The difference of course is that Christianity today has been reformed and moderated by science, secularism and common sense, whereas Islam has not.

  4. Iain Hall says:

    The difference of course is that Christianity today has been reformed and moderated by science, secularism and common sense, whereas Islam has not.

    That is true but in all of the ah, eer… “wisdom” the prophet of Islam had to insist that his revelations are final and complete therefore immune to reform which is why the followers of that faith seem to have so much trouble with modernity and in particular with notions like personal autonomy and fee will

  5. Tel says:

    As an Atheist myself, I much prefer to be an Atheist in a predominately Christian country than a predominately Muslim country. Plenty of horror stories coming out of Somalia and Pakistan too. The Sharia gangs of thugs are loose in places like Syria and Libya too, and probably soon Egypt will be the same.

    There’s no particular guarantee that the Dark Ages can’t happen again.

    Also, colonialism and apartheid were wrong, but not on the same scale of brutality as these medieval punishments. The whites in South Africa did repress the blacks, but they never just arbitrarily victimised people.

  6. Brian says:

    Also, colonialism and apartheid were wrong, but not on the same scale of brutality as these medieval punishments.

    Perhaps you’d better study some in-depth history of colonialism then Tel (and Iain). Like French colons in Indochina putting bounties on the decapitated heads of those who resisted colonialism. Read about what happened to the population of Goa that resisted conversion during the inquisition there. Or what happened to blacks under Portuguese rule who resisted Catholicism.

    Colonialism and slavery are economic imperatives of course. But they were supported and aided by religion, which was a co-beneficiary.

    The whites in South Africa did repress the blacks, but they never just arbitrarily victimised people.

    Are you serious? The whole structure of apartheid was about arbitrarily victimising an entire race of people. Again, this was done with violence when necessary (and sometimes when it wasn’t).

    Sadly, there’s nothing Western society loves to do more than to forget or whitewash its own history, while fingerpointing at the brutality of other societies.

  7. Iain Hall says:

    Also, colonialism and apartheid were wrong, but not on the same scale of brutality as these medieval punishments.

    Perhaps you’d better study some in-depth history of colonialism then Tel (and Iain). Like French colons in Indochina putting bounties on the decapitated heads of those who resisted colonialism. Read about what happened to the population of Goa that resisted conversion during the inquisition there. Or what happened to blacks under Portuguese rule who resisted Catholicism.

    I know that history is your stock in trade Brian but I would suggest that brutally was not in any-sense unique to the colonial experience and that the countries colonised generally had regimes that were just as brutal as the colonial administrations that replaced them

    Colonialism and slavery are economic imperatives of course. But they were supported and aided by religion, which was a co-beneficiary.

    I think it is not right to conflate colonialism with slavery or to suggest that it was part of the economic imperative of all colonialism. As for the religious think I think that it was more a case of the church riding on the coattails of the economic opportunists to spread their faith.

    The whites in South Africa did repress the blacks, but they never just arbitrarily victimised people.

    Are you serious? The whole structure of apartheid was about arbitrarily victimising an entire race of people. Again, this was done with violence when necessary (and sometimes when it wasn’t).

    I think that you need to be rather more specific than that and say that it was the Afrikaners who did the repressing and I think that Tel’s point is that they did not try and achieve the same level of social control that the Jihadists want in Mali. In fact they were uninterested in sort of society that the blacks had.

    Sadly, there’s nothing Western society loves to do more than to forget or whitewash its own history, while finger-pointing at the brutality of other societies.

    Western society has evolved and now we abhor excessive brutality as a rule, and to some extent I think this gives us a right to criticise societies that have not got to that level yet.

  8. Tel says:

    Brian, go find me a report where the white South African government subjected anyone to similar punishment to what is described above.

    The Spanish Inquisition was not typical of the European colonial period. That’s why it is so well remembered, because it was not typical.

  9. Brian says:

    Try the Truth and Reconciliation Commisson’s findings on several years of investigations, Tel:

    http://www.justice.gov.za/trc/report/index.htm

    Political murders from Biko down, torture, maiming, sexual assault and degradation, even chemical and medical experiments on political prisoners. Look up the activities of Wouter Basson, the Afrikaner Mengele. There are countless other examples in the TRC report.

    I’m not getting into a dick-waving contest about whether apartheid was worse than Islamic fundamentalism in Mali. Suffice to say they were/are both horrendous. But apartheid was not as benign or harmless as many like to claim, and as your earlier comment implies.

    The Spanish Inquisition WAS typical of the medieval period, in that heretics and non-conformists were murdered and tortured. The only difference is that the Inquisition did more of this in a shorter space of time.

  10. Iain Hall says:

    Brian

    Political murders from Biko down, torture, maiming, sexual assault and degradation, even chemical and medical experiments on political prisoners. Look up the activities of Wouter Basson, the Afrikaner Mengele. There are countless other examples in the TRC report.

    No one is saying that Apartheid was anything other than awful, but compared to the sort of things happening further north right now it was a holiday camp stay.

    I’m not getting into a dick-waving contest about whether apartheid was worse than Islamic fundamentalism in Mali. Suffice to say they were/are both horrendous. But apartheid was not as benign or harmless as many like to claim, and as your earlier comment implies.

    You can’t invoke that kind of argument with any credibility because there is horrendous an HORRENDOUS!

    The Spanish Inquisition WAS typical of the medieval period, in that heretics and non-conformists were murdered and tortured. The only difference is that the Inquisition did more of this in a shorter space of time.

    That is rather too simplistic in my opinion because with the inquisition we saw a formalised instrumentality created precisely to address heresy, so it was quite different to other mediaeval brutality.

  11. Brian says:

    No one is saying that Apartheid was anything other than awful, but compared to the sort of things happening further north right now it was a holiday camp stay.

    Exactly what “sort of things”? This article contains one account of violence, albeit quite a gory one. The rest of the story is a list of allegations and unsubstantiated rumours. You can’t make judgements about something on which there is as yet no evidence.

    You can’t invoke that kind of argument with any credibility because there is horrendous an HORRENDOUS!

    I suspect your paranoid Islamophobia is kicking in here, Iain. Islamic violence is HORRENDOUS while other kinds of violence are a “holiday camp”. If you can’t see the flaws in that kind of thinking, then I’m not sure what to say.

    That is rather too simplistic in my opinion because with the inquisition we saw a formalised instrumentality created precisely to address heresy, so it was quite different to other mediaeval brutality.

    The Inquisition differed only in that it concentrated investigate and judicial power in one body. Its mission (enforcing religious hegemony) and its methods (show trials, torture and execution) did not mark a deviation from how heretics were dealt with across much of the Middle Ages.

    To suggest the Inquisition was not typical of medieval attitudes or practices is like saying that because there’s a World Cup every four years, people don’t usually play football.

  12. Ray Dixon says:

    Oh for God’s sake, Brian, a spade is a spade. Even I agree with Iain here that these morons in Mali ARE in fact doing their treachery in the name of Islam. And Iain is right when he says that Western society has evolved and no longer commits such atrocities – yet you still drag up examples from the past, even hundreds of years ago. Wake up, this is 2012 and the type of butchery described here is appalling and should be loudly condemned, as should the teachings of Islam (in this case).

    That said, I’ll concede that Iain does take his anti-Islam stance too far by suggesting (as he often does) that events like this prove we shouldn’t allow muslims into Australia. He’s wrong about that because all it proves is that the jihadists have actually lost the war against the west and are now just turning their brutality onto their own people. Friggin’ backwards and unevolved neanderthals sums them up.

  13. Brian says:

    Go back to the start of the thread and educate yourself, rather than jumping in boots first Ray. We were discussing the relative impact of Islam and Christianity on systematic violence and genocide. I wasn’t downplaying what might be happening in Mali (which as yet is unclear and not substantiated). Nor was I making any excuses for either tribal thuggery or Islam. That should be obvious to anyone who can read.

  14. Ray Dixon says:

    No – you were changing the topic and comparing past Christian brutalities to current day Islamic ones. Apples & oranges. Have a lovely Xmas and do try not to contradict yourself so much.

  15. Brian says:

    You too Ray. Hopefully you have fun over Christmas and let off some steam, rather than doing it here.

  16. Craig says:

    First cousin marriage strengthens the bonds of clannish tribalism, culturally and genetically. It’s rather dysgenic on many levels to boot. This tribal family structure is still intact in Africa, the Middle East and many parts of Asia. I could go into other evolutionary race realism, but I think to many baby boomers minds would explode to the facts of science, rather then PC political ideology dressed up as science.

    Anglosaxon and German first cousin marriage was banned many centuries ago, so if it was not for the laws of the Catholic church in medieval times, Europeans wouldn’t have evolved the universalistic Liberal attitudes of today.

    So prog liberals should really be thanking the Catholic church, for the short term lease given to them. :)

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